Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Crazedwraith
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Crazedwraith »

Article 1 Article 2

Tory's plan for the license fee, freeze it for two years. Then let it raise with inflation and do away with it as soon as they legally can.

Basically a massive funding cut in real terms and then destroying it come 2027 (if they're still in power I guess) They've been sabotaging it for years with things like charging over 75s for licenses and managing to blame the BBC itself for it when they're the ones that cut the program.

That said the BBC's reps is in the decline at the moment, I keep seeing people say how right wing and Tory supporting the news is.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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I can't say that I've noticed, I've always preferred ITV news over BBC and Tory-supporting is definitely not something ITV can be accused of! :lol:
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Juubi Karakuchi »

If Bojo thought that picking on the BBC would help him, it doesn't seem to have worked.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... aotic-pmqs
David Davis tells Boris Johnson ‘in the name of God, go’ at chaotic PMQs
Tory grandee calls on Johnson to resign at PMQs featuring fierce exchanges between PM and Keir Starmer

Peter Walker and Rowena Mason
Wed 19 Jan 2022 13.27 GMT


The Tory grandee David Davis told Boris Johnson: “In the name of God, go,” during an often chaotic prime minister’s questions overshadowed by intense doubt about Johnson’s future.

After a fierce set of exchanges between Johnson and Keir Starmer, Davis rose to tell Johnson that he had spent weeks defending him from “angry constituents”, but that repeated reports about lockdown-breaching parties were too much.

The former Brexit secretary said: “I expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take. Yesterday he did the opposite of that. So I will remind him of a quotation which may be familiar to his ear, Leopold Amery to Neville Chamberlain: ‘You have sat too long here for any good you have been doing. In the name of God, go.’”

Asked by the Guardian afterwards what had motivated him to make an intervention, Davis said the interview given by the prime minister to Sky News on Tuesday was “not what I expect from a leader”.

“Up until now I had been supporting him … but it’s not leadership,” he said. “Yesterday’s interview was an attempt to escape responsibility, not to shoulder it. And that is a test of leadership.”

It is understood junior colleagues had been pressing Davis to make a statement publicly calling for the prime minister to go, saying the situation needed a “big figure” to intervene.

Earlier in prime minister’s questions, Starmer castigated Johnson for what he called “absurd and frankly unbelievable” explanations over Downing Street parties.

Despite speculation that the threshold of formal letters from Tory MPs seeking a confidence vote could be reached later on Wednesday, and the defection of the Bury South MP, Christian Wakeford, from the Tories to Labour just before PMQs, Johnson put up a bullish defence of his record.

One cabinet minister claimed Wakeford’s defection was “unifying” and would “draw a line under the whole thing”. In response to Davis’s intervention, they shrugged. But another cabinet minister said they recognised that the prime minister’s position was “precarious”.

Starmer took every opportunity to condemn and even mock the prime minister, with the Labour leader at one point noting the noisy government benches, asking if “the chief whip told them to bring their own boos”, a reference to the invitation sent to No 10 staff in May 2020.

“Every week the prime minister offers absurd and frankly unbelievable defences to the Downing Street parties, and each week it unravels,” Starmer told the Commons. “First he said there were no parties, then the video landed, blowing that defence out of the water. Next he said he was sickened and furious when he found out about the parties – until it turned out that he was at the Downing Street garden party.

“Then last week he said he didn’t realise he was at a party and, surprise surprise, no one believed him. So this week he’s got a new defence – nobody warned me that it was against the rules. Since the prime minister wrote the rules, why on earth does he think this new defence is going to work for him?”

In response to this and further questions, Johnson told Starmer he would have to wait for the outcome of a report on the parties by the senior civil servant Sue Gray, saying at one point: “I have said what I have said about the events in No 10.”

But Starmer kept pushing over Johnson’s explanation for why he attended an event in the Downing Street garden on 20 May 2020.

“It requires the prime minister to expect us to believe that whilst every other person who was invited on 20 May was told it was a social occasion, he alone was told it was a work meeting,” the Labour leader said. “It also requires the prime minister to ask us to accept that as he waded through the empty bottles and platters of sandwiches, he didn’t realise it was a party. Does the prime minister realise how ridiculous that sounds?”

Starmer ended by saying Johnson was “trying to save just one job – his own”.

Johnson replied by talking up his record over Covid and vaccinations, saying this was “thanks to the work of staff up and down Whitehall, across government, throughout the NHS.” He added: “And I am intensely proud of what this government has done.”
On top of this, Christian Wakeford - the Tory MP for Bury South, a Red Wall seat - has defected to Labour.

I'm having to seriously wrack my brains to figure out how Bojo can come back from this. Even if Sue Gray's report doesn't outright condemn him, I sincerely doubt that it can save him either; the facts speak for themselves.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Some have said that Christian Wakeford crossing the floor may actually unify the conservative party, though even if that happens it's likely to be brief.
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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I must admit I don't know if he's done more damage by defectimg than if he'd just written to the 1922 committee but it's certainly a statement.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Brief indeed.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... is-johnson
Tory defector says whips told him to back PM or lose school funds
Christian Wakeford allegation comes as senior Tory urges MPs to report claims of attempted blackmail

Peter Walker and Jessica Elgot
Thu 20 Jan 2022 13.54 GMT


The former Conservative MP Christian Wakeford has alleged that party whips told him he would lose funding for a new high school in his constituency if he did not vote with the government.

The claim came as the senior Conservative William Wragg urged MPs to report government ministers, whips and advisers to the Speaker – and even the police – for what he claimed was attempted blackmail of some colleagues suspected of possibly opposing Boris Johnson.

Anger among Johnson critics escalated again on Thursday after sources briefed that rebels were losing their nerve. Another MP opposing Johnson denied that letters of no confidence had been withdrawn after Wakeford defected to Labour.

“These briefings of withdrawals are pure invention from No 10,” one said. “Wakeford may have stayed some people’s hands yesterday but this isn’t going into reverse.”

Speaking at a Labour event on Thursday, Wakeford backed up the claims by Wragg that threats involving public money were made by the whips.

“I was threatened that I would not get a school for Radcliffe if I did not vote in one particular way,” he said. “This is a town that has not had a high school for the best part of 10 years.

“How would you feel when they hold back the regeneration of a town for a vote. It didn’t sit comfortably. That was the start of me questioning my place, where I was and ultimately to where I am now.”

Wragg, who chairs the public administration and constitutional affairs committee (PACAC), which looks into the work of government and the civil service, said whips had threatened to withdraw funding from the constituencies of MPs opposing Johnson.

Speaking at the start of a hearing of the PACAC, attended by Steve Barclay, the Cabinet Office minister, and Alex Chisholm, the department’s most senior civil servant, Wragg said he believed the actions breached the ministerial code.

“In recent days a number of members of parliament have faced pressures and intimidation from members of the government because of their declared or assumed desire for a vote of confidence in the party leadership of the prime minister,” he said.

“It is, of course, the duty of the government whips’ office to secure the government’s business in the House of Commons. However, it is not their function to breach the ministerial code in threatening to withdraw investment from members of parliaments’ constituencies which are funded from the public purse.

“Additionally, reports to me and others of members of staff at No 10 Downing Street, special advisers, government ministers and others encouraging the publication of stories in the press seeking to embarrass those who they suspect of lacking confidence in the prime minister are similarly unacceptable.”

“The intimidation of a member of parliament is a serious matter,” he added. “Moreover, the reports of which I’m aware would seem to constitute blackmail. As such it would be my general advice to colleagues to report these matters to the Speaker of the House of Commons and the commissioner of the Metropolitan police. And they are also welcome to contact me at any time.”

Wragg asked Barclay and Chisholm to convey his concerns to ministers and the civil service, which they said they would.

A No 10 spokesperson said: “We are not aware of any evidence to support what are clearly serious allegations. If there is any evidence to support these claims we would look at it very carefully.”

The Speaker, Lindsay Hoyle, said allegations about potentially criminal offences would be a matter for the police. “While the whipping system is long established, it is of course a contempt to obstruct members in the discharge of their duty or to attempt to intimidate a member in their parliamentary conduct by threats,” he said.

Angela Rayner, Labour’s deputy leader, said the alleged threats to withdraw investment to force support for Johnson were “disgusting”. She said: “These are grave and shocking accusations of bullying, blackmail, and misuse of public money and must be investigated thoroughly.”

Ed Davey, the Liberal Democrat leader, said the claims showed Downing Street was “now in full scorched earth mode”. He said: “All Boris Johnson cares about is saving his own skin. He’s acting more like a mafia boss than a prime minister.”

Wragg was one of the first Conservative MPs to call publicly for Johnson to go because of allegations about lockdown-breaching Downing Street parties, saying the prime minister’s position had become untenable.

For Johnson to face a confidence vote among his MPs, 54 of them – 15% of the total – would need to submit letters seeking this to the 1922 Committee, which represents backbenchers. There have been regular predictions this week that the total was about to be met, but it has not yet happened.

Wakeford, introducing a speech by Rachel Reeves in Bury the day after his defection, said it was “a great honour, if not a surprise, to be here today”.

He said Labour was “ready to provide an alternative government that this country can be proud of. and deserves, and certainly not to be embarrassed by, that is one of the reasons I am here today.”.
A quick recap. A senior Tory MP has accused Bojo of blackmailing MPs to keep him in power; and Wakeford has cited the same as the reason for his defection.

A consensus seems to be emerging that the MPs will wait for Sue Gray's report before anything else happens; and said report is apparent due some time next week.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... f-february
In a further development, Liz Truss claims that she will have an agreement with the EU over Northern Ireland in place by the end of February. My inner conspiracy theorist thinks she will seek to be either Prime Minister, or safely reshuffled to another job by the new Prime Minister, before that deadline.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Boris Johnson had birthday bash during lockdown, ITV News understands.
ITV News understands Boris Johnson had a birthday party during the first lockdown in 2020 despite the rules forbidding social gatherings indoors at the time.

It's alleged that the prime minister's wife, Carrie Johnson, helped organise a surprise get-together for him on the afternoon of 19 June just after 2pm.

Up to 30 people are said to have attended the event in the Cabinet Room after Boris Johnson returned from an official visit to a school in Hertfordshire.

ITV News understands that the interior designer, Lulu Lytle - who was not a member of No 10 staff - also attended the gathering. At the time Ms Lytle was renovating Boris Johnson’s flat in Downing Street, which has been the subject of a separate controversy.

Nine days before the alleged birthday bash at No 10, on 10 June, Mr Johnson asked the public "to continue to show restraint and respect the rules which are designed to keep us all safe" during a Downing Street Covid press conference

ITV News also understands that on the evening of 19 June 2020, family friends were hosted upstairs in the prime minister’s residence in an apparent further breach of the rules. Number 10 have denied this, claiming the prime minister only hosted a small number of family members outside.
At the afternoon event, Carrie Johnson and Lulu Lytle are believed to have presented the prime minister with a cake whilst his wife led staff in a chorus of happy birthday.
Those assembled are understood to have eaten picnic food from M&S, with the gathering lasting for around 20-30 minutes. Downing St say the prime minister only attended for less than 10 minutes.

In June 2020 social gatherings indoors were still forbidden under lockdown laws. At the time there was also intense concern about the potential for singing to spread Covid-19, with choirs unable to meet to rehearse.

ITV News understands those present at the afternoon party included the prime minister’s principal private secretary, Martin Reynolds, who had previously invited over 100 staff to a drinks party on 20 May 2020.

Jack Doyle, currently No10's director of communications, and the head of operations, Shelley Williams-Walker, are also said to have been there. They were joined by other members of the Prime Minister's Private Office, No10 special advisers and No10 operations and events staff.

The week before his birthday party, Boris Johnson had asked the rest of the country to stick to the guidance in a press conference from Downing Street.
“I urge everyone to continue to show restraint and respect the rules which are designed to keep us all safe. It’s only because of the restraint that everyone, you all have shown so far, that we are able to move gradually out of this lockdown”, he said on 10 June 2020.

He added: "It is emphatically not designed for people who don't qualify to start meeting inside other people's homes - that remains against the law."
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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A complication.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/202 ... is-johnson
What does police inquiry into alleged parties mean for Boris Johnson?
Cressida Dick says force is investigating ‘number of events’ that may have broken Covid rules

Jamie Grierson
Tue 25 Jan 2022 12.18 GMT


The Metropolitan police are investigating alleged parties at Downing Street and Whitehall where people may have breached Covid laws, the force’s chief, Cressida Dick, has announced in a major intervention. Here we look at what’s happened and what it could mean.

What has Dick announced?
Speaking at the London Assembly’s police and crime committee on Tuesday, the Met police commissioner said the force was investigating “a number of events” that took place at Downing Street and Whitehall in potential breach of Covid-19 regulations over the past two years.

Met officers had looked into several other events in Downing Street and Whitehall, which had been assessed as not reaching the threshold for criminal investigation, Dick said. But she would not say which.

In a separate statement, the Met police said: “Where multiple events occurred on a particular date at a location, all the events on that date will initially fall within the remit of the investigation so that the full circumstances can be established. This does not mean that everyone who attended an event will be investigated.”

What’s the justification for investigating now and not sooner?
Allegations of lockdown parties in Downing Street emerged in December 2021 and have snowballed since. Dick said it would “not normally be” a proportionate use of the force’s resources to investigate historical allegations of Covid breaches.

But she told London Assembly members that investigations were carried out for “the most serious and flagrant type of breach” where there was evidence and three criteria were met.

“My three factors were and are: there was evidence that those involved knew, or ought to have known that what they were doing was an offence; where not investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law; and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence.

“So in those cases, where those criteria were met, the guidelines suggested that we should potentially investigate further and end up giving people tickets.”

She said specialist detectives had continually considered whether a criminal investigation into any of the Downing Street and Whitehall events was proportionate based on the available information.

In recent days, she said, the Cabinet Office had provided outline findings from its inquiry to the Met. This is a reference to the inquiry being led by the senior civil servant Sue Gray.

What will this mean for the Gray inquiry?
The pivotal inquiry by Gray was expected to be published late this week. But publication will now be delayed until the Met has concluded its investigation, according to sources, which could take weeks. No timeline has been given.

Many MPs were awaiting the results of the Gray inquiry before deciding whether to submit letters of no confidence in the prime minister.

How serious is this development for the prime minister?
Very. The investigation raises the prospect of sanctions for Johnson and his staff if regulations are found to have been breached. Dick raised the prospect of fixed penalty notices being issued for some, but not all, of those attending, depending on the conclusions of the investigation.

The launch of a criminal inquiry and delay of the Gray report could create breathing space for Boris Johnson. Some commentators are already arguing the moves will be a form of reprieve for the prime minister, with interest and fury waning by the time the findings are published.

But it could also spur MPs to submit their letters now. A total of 54 letters would trigger a no-confidence vote, and the prime minister would be forced to resign if 180 or more MPs vote against him in a secret ballot.
Hard to say whether this is good or bad. The risk of the public getting bored or distracted in the meantime - and Labour's poll lead dropping - is nontrivial. That said, it's not guaranteed to happen either. Also, the police getting involved means the stakes are a lot higher. Even if the only punishment is a fine, it's still embarrassing.

On the whole, I'd say this is only delaying the inevitable. But I've been wrong before.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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BoJo to call Putin and visit eastern Europe

I'm sure that'll calm the whole thing down, he needs a distraction from his issues at home, much like Putin.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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They're going to get plastered and decide a good solid war's just the thing to create employment and bring people together, aren't they?
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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I wouldn't put it past Bojo to welcome a war; if only for the distraction.

On the plus side, he has until the end of February to make it work. It's hard to have a war while knee-deep in mud.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Second resignation in one day as PM's top aide Jack Doyle quits amid partygate scandal.
No 10’s director of communications Jack Doyle has quit.
There was pressure on Mr Doyle to go over after ITV News reported that he made a ​thank you ​speech and handed out awards at an alleged Downing Street Christmas party on December 18. Said party is currently being investigated by the police.

According to the Daily Mail, Mr Doyle told staff as he resigned: “Recent weeks have taken a terrible toll on my family life. Thank you all for your hard work and dedication. I wish you all the best for the future.”

However, he reportedly added that he had always intended to resign after two years.

The PM is said to have previously refused Mr Doyle's resignation, but on Thursday a Downing Street spokesperson confirmed his departure, saying: "He has made a huge contribution and the prime minister is immensely grateful for the work he has done".

Mr Doyle is the second of Mr Johnson's close allies to resign in just one day. Munira Mirza, the PM's policy chief, handed in her resignation over Boris Johnson's Jimmy Savile smear.

As she quit, Ms Mirza cited her boss's refusal to apologise for the false accusation that Sir Keir failed to lock up paedophile Savile while he was director of public prosecutions.

In a live broadcast on the cost-of-living crisis, Mr Sunak praised Ms Mirza as a "valued colleague" and criticised the prime minister's Savile remark, saying: "I wouldn't have said it."

Earlier in the day, the chancellor did not rule out a leadership bid if Tory MPs force out Mr Johnson over allegations of lockdown-breaching parties in Downing Street.

Alongside the threat of a leadership challenge, the PM reportedly faces losing his Principal Private Secretary Martin Reynolds.

Mr Reynolds sent an email inviting over 100 employees to a drinks party in the Number 10 garden during the height of nationwide lockdown to "make the most of the lovely weather". The event is also under investigation by the Met Police.
ITV News Politics Editor Robert Peston reported that "everyone in Whitehall" knows that Mr Reynolds will leave his post soon.

"His chief of staff Dan Rosenfield is constantly battered by negative stories in the press," Peston added.
The only thing Boris is good at is digging himself deeper.
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Two aides resigned in 24 hours.

That Bojo tried to refuse Doyle's resignation is interesting in itself. It smacks of panic, and I suspect that's what a lot of Tory MPs will see. Team Boris is falling apart.

One amusing bit of trivia. Munira Mirza started her political career as a member of the Revolutionary Communist Party. And she's not the only Tory to have started out there.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Cressida Dick to step down as Metropolitan Police chief
Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick is leaving her role after a series of damaging controversies.

Dame Cressida said she had been left with "no choice" after London Mayor Sadiq Khan made it clear to her he had no confidence in her leadership.

Last week, the police watchdog found "disgraceful" misogyny, discrimination and sex harassment among some Met PCs.

Dame Cressida was the first woman to lead the UK's biggest police force.

Speaking on BBC London hours before her departure was announced, she said she was "seething angry" about the watchdog's findings and that she had "absolutely no intention" of quitting.

But in his statement, Mr Khan said he was "not satisfied" with Dame Cressida's response and that she "will be stepping aside" as a result.

Mr Khan thanked the commissioner for her 40-year policing career.

He said he would now "work closely with the home secretary on the appointment of a new commissioner" with an aim to restore trust in the Met.
Home Secretary Priti Patel said Dame Cressida held the role "during challenging times" and that she "exemplified the increasingly diverse nature of our police".

Dame Cressida, who served in the role for four years, has agreed with the mayor that she will continue to serve for a short time period to enable an orderly handover.

'Damaged confidence'
She said in a written statement: "It is with huge sadness that following contact with the mayor of London today, it is clear that the mayor no longer has sufficient confidence in my leadership to continue.

"He has left me no choice but to step aside as commissioner of the Metropolitan Police Service."

"The murder of Sarah Everard and many other awful cases recently have, I know, damaged confidence in this fantastic police service," she added.

"There is much to do - and I know that the Met has turned its full attention to rebuilding public trust and confidence. For that reason I am very optimistic about the future for the Met and for London."

Ken Marsh, the chairman of the Metropolitan Police Federation, which represents rank and file officers in London, said Dame Cressida had been unfairly treated.

"We feel the way she has been treated is wholly unfair and we did believe that she was the person who could take us through this and bring us out the other side," he said.

BBC home affairs correspondent June Kelly said the relationship between the mayor and commissioner has to work - and once Dame Cressida had lost his confidence, and after he was so public about that, things had become toxic.

June Kelly added this was a repeat of a situation we saw more than a decade ago, when then Commissioner Sir Ian Blair was forced out by the former London Mayor Boris Johnson.
the headline says stepped down but obviously it's clear she's pushed. It's notable that BoJo and Patel had extended her tenure recently feeling the next guy in line internally was not likely to be on their side.

I'm not entirely clear on how it works with the home secretary and London mayor both having a say and it can't be easy when they're from opposing parties.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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All this plus Sir John Major having a go at Boris' no 10 parties as well.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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https://www.theguardian.com/politics/20 ... met-police
PM sent Downing Street lockdown party questionnaire by Met police

Boris Johnson contacted over alleged parties that took place while the UK was under strict Covid curbs

Aubrey Allegretti and Vikram Dodd
Fri 11 Feb 2022 22.40 GMT


Boris Johnson has been sent a questionnaire by Scotland Yard over alleged parties in Downing Street, in a move that could raise fresh concerns among Tory MPs about his leadership.

No 10 confirmed late on Friday night that the prime minister received the document, and vowed he would respond to it “as required”.

About 50 people were asked to account for their presence at the dozen events under scrutiny by the police as part of their inquiry into Covid law breaches, named “Operation Hillman”.

Johnson has continued to insist he broke no rules, but apologised for attending one gathering which was a “bring your own booze” garden party organised by his principal private secretary on 20 May 2020.

He is also believed to have been present at a birthday celebration in No 10 on 19 June 2020 and leaving dos for aides in November that year, and January 2021. Police are also investigating a gathering in his personal flat in Downing Street.

In a clear signal officers are investigating if the prime minister personally broke the law, a No 10 spokesperson said: “We can confirm the prime minister has received a questionnaire from the Metropolitan police. He will respond as required.”

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The move has the potential to spark fresh concerns among Tory MPs about Johnson’s future, though with parliament in recess, many will spend the next nine days back in their constituencies.

Some backbenchers have held off calling for a ballot on his leadership until the outcome of the Met’s investigation, though suggested that they could submit a letter of no confidence if Johnson is found to have misled parliament or is fined for breaking the Covid rules he set.

The Met declined to confirm the news that the prime minister had received the questionnaire nor whether those receiving them were being treated as potential suspects or witnesses.

Earlier this week, Scotland Yard explained its approach and the role the questionnaire would play.

It said the document “asks for an account and explanation of the recipient’s participation in an event” and “has formal legal status and must be answered truthfully”.

The Met added: “Recipients are informed that responses are required within seven days. In most cases contact is being made via email.

“It should be noted that being contacted does not mean a fixed penalty notice will necessarily be issued to that person.

“Nevertheless, if following an investigation, officers believe it is appropriate because the Covid regulations have been breached without a reasonable excuse, a fixed penalty notice will normally be issued.”

If police decide laws have been broken, then they will send the paperwork to the criminal records office, who will formally issue the fixed penalty notice.

Cressida Dick, hours before she was forced out as the Met commissioner, said of those sent questionnaires: “Some, but probably not all, may very well end up with a fixed-penalty notice.”

She added the scandal had “hugely disgusted many members of the public to see”.
It's not exactly questioning under oath. But he is still basically under criminal investigation.

From what I've been able to find out, the legal question comes down to the nature of Number 10 Downing Street; with Bojo's lawyers basically arguing that since it is both an office and a home, the rules were technically not broken.

I'm almost willing to believe that Bojo is finished. Almost.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Juubi Karakuchi wrote: 2022-02-12 06:26am I'm almost willing to believe that Bojo is finished. Almost.

if it was going to stick it would have stuck by now I think.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Juubi Karakuchi »

Crazedwraith wrote: 2022-02-12 06:43am
Juubi Karakuchi wrote: 2022-02-12 06:26am I'm almost willing to believe that Bojo is finished. Almost.

if it was going to stick it would have stuck by now I think.
You may be right, unfortunately.

At the very least, I'd say Bojo has been weakened. The illusion of power and popularity is largely gone; in part because one or more of its main architects - a certain D. Cummings of Bishop Auckland - is actively working to dismantle it. His current survival depends on three factors; public boredom, a curious unwillingness of Tory MPs to move against him, and the support of the lunatic fringe. In the lattermost case he is imitating Trump; build a personal power base among the crazies, with the threat that if he is slung out, they will take their votes elsewhere.

The excuse a lot of Tory MPs are giving is that they're waiting for the Met to fine/charge him or not, and for Sue Gray's full report. Apart from that, Bojo's last chance is the May elections. We'll know for sure by May/June sort of time.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by His Divine Shadow »

Even if Bojo was gone, would anything change?
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Juubi Karakuchi »

Not really. But seeing Bojo's dreams crumble to dust would offer some mild amusement.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Crazedwraith »

This headline made me chuckle.

Ex-government ethics chief Helen MacNamara admits to lockdown party fine
The BBC wrote: The government's former head of ethics has apologised after receiving a fine from the police for attending a party in the Cabinet Office during lockdown.

Helen MacNamara was reported to have gone to a leaving do for a civil servant on 18 June 2020.

It is one of 12 events being investigated by the police.

The former civil servant said she had "accepted and paid the fixed penalty notice", adding: "I am sorry for the error of judgement I have shown."

Ms MacNamara is the first person to be named as part of the Met Police's investigation into lockdown parties in Downing Street and across Whitehall during Covid lockdowns in 2020 and 2021.

Last week, the force confirmed it had sent out 20 fines so far, with sources telling the BBC some had been given to people who attended a leaving party in Downing Street on 16 April 2021 - the eve of Prince Philip's funeral.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson did not attend either leaving do and has so far not been issued with a fine.

He is believed to have attended at least three of the gatherings being investigated by the police.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

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Boris and Carrie Johnson apologise over partygate and pay fines for Covid breaches.
The prime minister and his wife Carrie Johnson have both apologised and paid their £50 fines for breaking Covid regulations, Boris Johnson has confirmed.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak was also among those set to receive partygate fines from the Metropolitan Police, Number 10 revealed, however it is not yet clear whether he has paid his.

It is understood he has the option to appeal the fine in court, should he disagree with the police decision that he broke Covid rules.

The fines are in relation a birthday celebration that all three attended on June 19, 2020 - a party first reported by ITV News in January.

Mr Johnson, explaining what happened that day, said: there was a brief gathering in the Cabinet Room shortly after 2pm lasting for less than 10 minutes, during which people I work with kindly passed on their good wishes.

"And I have to say in all frankness at that time it did not occur to me that this might have been a breach of the rules."

Mr Johnson, speaking from his countryside retreat Chequers, told broadcasters he would like to "offer a full apology and in the spirit of openness and humility".

The PM said he takes "full responsibility for everything" that happened in government during the pandemic, but that he "couldn't be everywhere at once" when asked about the widespread nature of the gatherings across Whitehall.

Many of his critics say the police fine shows he misled Parliament with his claim that all Covid guidelines were followed on Downing Street during the pandemic and that under the ministerial code he should resign.

But Mr Johnson said he "spoke in completely good faith" because it had not occurred to him when addressing MPs on December 8 over separate party allegations, "that I was in breach of the rules".

"I now humbly accept that I was," he added as he resisted calls to resign.

"I think the best thing I can do now is, having settled the fine, is focus on the job in hand. That's what I'm going to do," he said.

Mrs Johnson has also said sorry, with her spokesperson saying she "apologises unreservedly" for attending the gathering, despite believing "that she was acting in accordance with the rules at the time".

The fines were paid at a reduced rate of £50, down from £100, because it was paid within a 14 day period.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer called on Mr Johnson and the chancellor to resign, saying the police fines prove they had "broken the law and repeatedly lied to the British public".

"They must both resign," Sir Keir said, "the Conservatives are totally unfit to govern. Britain deserves better".

He told broadcasters that Mr Johnson's fine marked the "first time in the history of our country that a prime minister has been found to be in breach of the law".

"And then he lied repeatedly to the public about it," he said, "Britain deserves better, they have to go".

Many of the PM's former critics have remain quiet following news of his fine, with a number privately saying they would not comment either because of the war in Ukraine or until the full police investigation has concluded.

Culture Secretary Nadine Dorries, one of Mr Johnson's most vocal supporters, said the prime minister briefly attended a birthday celebration for "less than 10 minutes during a busy working day".

The Met Police has previously said the event was held between 2pm and 3pm.

Sir Roger Gale, who was the first Tory MP to publicly reveal he had submitted a letter of no confidence in Mr Johnson, said the prime minister has "mislead the House [of Commons]".

He stopped short, however, of calling for his resignation, pointing to the crisis in Ukraine as reason not to force a change in government at the current time.

"I’m not surprised, I'm naturally disappointed, I think the prime minister faces a very serious situation, which the House of Commons is going to have to deal with because patently he has misled the house," he told ITV News.

"But, that said, we are in the middle of an international crisis, and now is absolutely not the time to destabilise the government, a government that is actually leading the international coalition against Putin.

"And I will not say or do anything that will give one crumb of comfort to the man who is creating war crimes in Ukraine."

'Patently he has misled the house... now is absolutely not the time to destabilise the government'

The Liberal Democrats are calling for Parliament - which is currently in its Easter recess - to be recalled so "MPs can hold a vote of no confidence" in the prime minister.

SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford said Mr Johnson and Mr Sunak “must resign now” as they have “insulted the millions of people who faithfully followed the rules that they set”.

Scottish Tory leader Douglas Ross, however, said it “wouldn’t be right” to remove the prime minister during the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Labour, the Lib Dems and the SNP have called for Parliament to be recalled in order for Boris Johnson to face MPs.

However, Labour acknowledged that only the government has the power to ask the Speaker to recall Parliament.
Could the prime minister be removed?

The PM could be removed by his own party if at least 53 of his MPs to submit letters of no confidence in his leadership to the 1922 Committee, which represents backbench Tories.

If the committee receives 53 letters a confidence submit letters to the committee it will trigger a secret ballot, giving MPs the chance to back or boot the leader.

If more than 50% of Tory MPs then vote to remove him, he will lose his role of party leader and a fresh leadership election will follow.

If he wins over half the votes, then he will remain party leader and be given a year's immunity from any further confidence votes.

An alternative route could see the opposition table a vote of no confidence in Mr Johnson in the House of Commons but that would require a majority of MPs to back it and that is probably unlikely given the Tories' huge majority.

ITV News UK Editor Paul Brand said the initial feeling among Tory backbenchers is that the PM "will survive this" because it is thought there's "not sufficient momentum right now to remove him as leader".

Mr Johnson's time as prime minister appeared to be hanging in the balance after police first announced they were investigating partygate but pressure for his resignation appears to have been temporality halted by the war in Ukraine.

However, now that the PM is being fined - an unprecedented situation - it is highly likely that he will once again face calls to quit from within his own party.

He's one of at least 100 people being probed by officers looking into allegations of widespread Covid-rule-breaking in government, with 12 events being investigated.

The prime minister is understood to have attended at least six of the gatherings - held during various lockdowns - however his excuse is that his attendance was always part of his working day.

UK Editor Paul Brand said the occurrence of more than 50 Covid breaches makes Whitehall one of the UK's top coronavirus offenders.

The force said it had now made more than 50 referrals for fixed penalty notices (FPNs) to the ACRO Criminal Records Office over breaches of Covid-19 regulations in Whitehall and Downing Street.

The identities of people issued with FPNs have not been disclosed publicly by the Met, nor the event a fine relates to.

In a statement updating the public on Operation Hillman - as the partygate probe is known - the Met said it is continuing to review evidence and further fines could be issued.

It said: "We are making every effort to progress this investigation at speed, this includes continuing to assess significant amounts of investigative material from which further referrals may be made to ACRO."

The ACRO Criminal Records Office will accept the referrals and is responsible for issuing the fines.

Police said the first 20 fines were being issued two weeks ago and since then the PM had refused to accept they show rules were broken on Downing Street.

More than 30 partygate fines were announced by the Met on Tuesday morning, bringing the number of confirmed Covid breaches on government premises to more than 50.
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Crazedwraith »

Of course because of Ukraine it's totally the wrong time for a change in leadership :roll:

BoJo must be loving The War talking all the heat off of him, and so much good publicity and photo ops to be had.
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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by EnterpriseSovereign »

He's still facing calls to resign. Really it's just a shame that after going to Ukraine, he came back. :wanker:
It's no use debating a moron; they drag you down to their level then beat you with experience. Intelligent argument is wasted on the stupid.

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Re: Brexit and not very united kingdom politics II

Post by Juubi Karakuchi »

This won't bring Bojo down on its own; but it's come at a bad time. The local council elections are on May 5th; 3 weeks away. If the Tories take a clobbering, there will be trouble.

As for the Tory party itself, politics.co.uk has this to offer.

https://www.politics.co.uk/news-feature ... w-line-up/

To cut a very long article short, their numbers for Tory MPs are as follows;

Openly calling for the PM to go - 15
Considered hostile - 47
Signs of concern for the PM. - 56
Currently lying low - 89
Probable supporter - 66
Publicly backing the PM - 87
Total - 360

Of these, 54 No confidence letters are needed for a leadership contest, and 181 votes would be needed to oust Bojo.If the hostiles are combined with the not-sure in the middle (the first four categories), that comes to 207 votes. So while Bojo is not in immediate danger, things are looking a bit shaky. A bad result in the Council elections could seriously damage his position.

And on top of that, the Northern Ireland elections take place at the same time, and Sinn Fein is projected to win. Interesting times.
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