General Police Abuse Thread

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Alyrium Denryle
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Re: Another bad police story

Post by Alyrium Denryle »

Block wrote:
Lord Relvenous wrote:"He's fine..."

This shit always sickens me. My local area police are a bit notorious for shooting people not "technically" in need of shooting and in every case the officer has seen little to no repercussions for his decision to use an unbelievably unreasonable amount of force.

Also, I'm just going to put out that it's a situation with a minority "perpetrator" and all white police. Make of that what you will, but I'm sure it'll be a talking point surrounding this.
They clearly called paramedics for him, and the video doesn't show any context at all, did he resist? how hard? There's a lot of missing footage that would be very helpful.

Beating someone to death is by definition an unreasonable use of force. Even if the person is "combative", their capacity to resist generally stops well before their life is at risk.

They should all be charged with manslaughter. At least. But likely they wont even be fired, let alone charged.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Has the cause of death been released? Did they start hitting him before or after he resisted arrest and "got combative"? Did they actually hit him or did they just restrain and pin him so they could cuff him? Does he have any heart condition that they couldn't have known about? Cause it looked like they had him cuffed then he flopped over from shock. What was the 911 call they responded to, because if they were given bad info by the caller, it's not their fault for grabbing the guy in a domestic abuse call. As much as you'd love for it to be cut and dry, no court in the world would convict based on just what's shown.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Block wrote:Has the cause of death been released? Did they start hitting him before or after he resisted arrest and "got combative"? Did they actually hit him or did they just restrain and pin him so they could cuff him? Does he have any heart condition that they couldn't have known about? Cause it looked like they had him cuffed then he flopped over from shock. What was the 911 call they responded to, because if they were given bad info by the caller, it's not their fault for grabbing the guy in a domestic abuse call. As much as you'd love for it to be cut and dry, no court in the world would convict based on just what's shown.
How do you know he was resisting arrest? How do you know they even had a reason to arrest him? Why is your scepticism only one way?
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Re: Another bad police story

Post by Kamakazie Sith »

Lord Relvenous wrote:
Block wrote:
Lord Relvenous wrote:"He's fine..."

This shit always sickens me. My local area police are a bit notorious for shooting people not "technically" in need of shooting and in every case the officer has seen little to no repercussions for his decision to use an unbelievably unreasonable amount of force.

Also, I'm just going to put out that it's a situation with a minority "perpetrator" and all white police. Make of that what you will, but I'm sure it'll be a talking point surrounding this.
They clearly called paramedics for him, and the video doesn't show any context at all, did he resist? how hard? There's a lot of missing footage that would be very helpful.
Oh yeah, the lack of context could very well turn out to be painting a completely erroneous picture here. But I'm skeptical of that.

Past that though, what sickened me was the disinterested tone of the police officer that just beat in the brains of the wrong guy. He could not give less fucks about the wife's emotional distress or the actual well-being of the citizen he just helped kill. Even is the man did resist, I would prefer the peace officers of my country to not be so unmoved by having to resort to using lethal force against an unarmed man.
You're confused. Luis Rodriquez didn't die on scene. He died at the hospital. Thus, in the minds of the cops they had not resorted to lethal force and probably did believe he was fine.
Alyrium wrote:
Beating someone to death is by definition an unreasonable use of force. Even if the person is "combative", their capacity to resist generally stops well before their life is at risk.

They should all be charged with manslaughter. At least. But likely they wont even be fired, let alone charged.
I agree. Five cops shouldn't have to resort to closed fist attacks against one man in all but the most extreme situations. If they did beat him so hard that he sustained bone damage to his face, like his daughter alleged, then they should be held accountable. However, the video doesn't show the officers striking Luis Rodriquez in any way and the brief shot of his face isn't very clear. The video does show them pinning him down and I've read that he was hit with pepper spray.
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Re: Another bad police story

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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Block »

mr friendly guy wrote:
Block wrote:Has the cause of death been released? Did they start hitting him before or after he resisted arrest and "got combative"? Did they actually hit him or did they just restrain and pin him so they could cuff him? Does he have any heart condition that they couldn't have known about? Cause it looked like they had him cuffed then he flopped over from shock. What was the 911 call they responded to, because if they were given bad info by the caller, it's not their fault for grabbing the guy in a domestic abuse call. As much as you'd love for it to be cut and dry, no court in the world would convict based on just what's shown.
How do you know he was resisting arrest? How do you know they even had a reason to arrest him? Why is your scepticism only one way?
It does go both ways. I asked in an earlier post, why was force used at all...
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Re: Another bad police story

Post by Lord Relvenous »

Kamakazie Sith wrote:
Lord Relvenous wrote: Oh yeah, the lack of context could very well turn out to be painting a completely erroneous picture here. But I'm skeptical of that.

Past that though, what sickened me was the disinterested tone of the police officer that just beat in the brains of the wrong guy. He could not give less fucks about the wife's emotional distress or the actual well-being of the citizen he just helped kill. Even is the man did resist, I would prefer the peace officers of my country to not be so unmoved by having to resort to using lethal force against an unarmed man.
You're confused. Luis Rodriquez didn't die on scene. He died at the hospital. Thus, in the minds of the cops they had not resorted to lethal force and probably did believe he was fine.
This argument confuses me. So as long as the suspect doesn't die on the scene, a cop can never use lethal force in their own minds? If a police officer shoots a suspect in the stomach, is that not lethal force in his mind until he sees the suspect die?

They beat this man so bad he died. If they don't realize what they used was enough to potentially kill a man, then their training needs to get fucking overhauled yesterday.

And here's the latest video making the rounds. Man, I'm so glad we dispatch men with tactical rifles and flashbangs to handle mentally unstable homeless men with 2" knives. And hey, seeing as how all he has are knives, we should flashbang him, yell instructions at him, and approach him. Yes, this man was threatening the officers, but come on. No attempt to use nonlethal force, no attempt to actually communicate with the man, no attempt to diffuse the situation, and they riddle him as he has his back turned.

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Re: Another bad police story

Post by Kamakazie Sith »

Lord Relvenous wrote: This argument confuses me. So as long as the suspect doesn't die on the scene, a cop can never use lethal force in their own minds? If a police officer shoots a suspect in the stomach, is that not lethal force in his mind until he sees the suspect die?
Generally physical force isn't considered lethal force. Don't misunderstand. If they actually did beat this guys head in then it would be obvious to the officers involved due to the injuries that they would have inflicted on him and I would share in your disappointment. However, that hasn't been substantiated at all. The video doesn't show them beating him. I see below that you've come upon some conclusive information.
They beat this man so bad he died. If they don't realize what they used was enough to potentially kill a man, then their training needs to get fucking overhauled yesterday.
I guess this means that you've found the medical examiners report. Will you please post it here?
And here's the latest video making the rounds. Man, I'm so glad we dispatch men with tactical rifles and flashbangs to handle mentally unstable homeless men with 2" knives. And hey, seeing as how all he has are knives, we should flashbang him, yell instructions at him, and approach him. Yes, this man was threatening the officers, but come on. No attempt to use nonlethal force, no attempt to actually communicate with the man, no attempt to diffuse the situation, and they riddle him as he has his back turned.
That video shows 3 minutes and 58 seconds of a five hour stand off and there is communication at the start of the video and lots prior to that. That being said I too share concerns with how that developed. The K9 officer should have stayed back and allowed the dog to its job or called it back. He should not have moved in. That was stupid and played a significant role in why shots were fired instead of bean bag rounds.

It appears that their plan was to take this individual into custody using the K9 to bring him down. The flashbang was used to disorientate him and give the dog time to close the distance and bite. However, the K9 went in briefly then backed off for some reason then attacked a bag that he dropped. This failure was aggravated when the K9 officer decided to run to his dog instead of holding back.

As for the shooting itself. I believe he was shot in the front first by the officer closest to him. The officer with the helmet cam reacted to the gunfire and opened fire right after which is why he was shot in the back as well.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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The Economist recently had a relevant article, about the militarization of America's police:
FROM the way police entered the house—helmeted and masked, guns drawn and shields in front, knocking down the door with a battering ram and rushing inside—you might think they were raiding a den of armed criminals. In fact they were looking for $1,000-worth of clothes and electronics allegedly bought with a stolen credit card. They found none of these things, but arrested two people in the house on unrelated charges.

They narrowly avoided tragedy. On hearing intruders break in, the homeowner’s son, a disabled ex-serviceman, reached for his (legal) gun. Luckily, he heard the police announce themselves and holstered it; otherwise, “they probably would have shot me,” he says. His mother, Sally Prince, says she is now traumatised.

Gary Mikulec, chief of the Ankeny, Iowa police force, which raided Ms Prince’s home in January, said that the suspects arrested “were not very good people”. One had a criminal history that included three assault charges, albeit more than a decade old, and on his arrest was found to have a knife and a meth pipe.

It is easy to see why the police like to be better armed than the people they have to arrest. They risk their lives every day, and are understandably keen to get home in one piece. A big display of force can make a suspect think twice about pulling a gun. “An awful lot of SWAT tactics are focused on forcing the suspect to surrender,” says Bill Bratton, New York’s police chief.

But civil libertarians such as Radley Balko, the author of “Rise of the Warrior Cop”, fret that the American police are becoming too much like soldiers. Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) teams (ie, paramilitary police units) were first formed to deal with violent civil unrest and life-threatening situations: shoot-outs, rescuing hostages, serving high-risk warrants and entering barricaded buildings, for instance. Their mission has crept.

Boozers, barbers and cockfighters
Peter Kraska, a professor at Eastern Kentucky University’s School of Justice Studies, estimates that SWAT teams were deployed about 3,000 times in 1980 but are now used around 50,000 times a year. Some cities use them for routine patrols in high-crime areas. Baltimore and Dallas have used them to break up poker games. In 2010 New Haven, Connecticut sent a SWAT team to a bar suspected of serving under-age drinkers. That same year heavily-armed police raided barber shops around Orlando, Florida; they said they were hunting for guns and drugs but ended up arresting 34 people for “barbering without a licence”. Maricopa County, Arizona sent a SWAT team into the living room of Jesus Llovera, who was suspected of organising cockfights. Police rolled a tank into Mr Llovera’s yard and killed more than 100 of his birds, as well as his dog. According to Mr Kraska, most SWAT deployments are not in response to violent, life-threatening crimes, but to serve drug-related warrants in private homes.

He estimates that 89% of police departments serving American cities with more than 50,000 people had SWAT teams in the late 1990s—almost double the level in the mid-1980s. By 2007 more than 80% of police departments in cities with between 25,000 and 50,000 people had them, up from 20% in the mid-1980s (there are around 18,000 state and local police agencies in America, compared with fewer than 100 in Britain).

The number of SWAT deployments soared even as violent crime fell. And although in recent years crime rates have risen in smaller American cities, Mr Kraska writes that the rise in small-town SWAT teams was driven not by need, but by fear of being left behind. Fred Leland, a police lieutenant in the small town of Walpole, Massachusetts, says that police departments in towns like his often invest in military-style kit because they “want to keep up” with larger forces.

The courts have smiled on SWAT raids. They often rely on “no-knock” warrants, which authorise police to force their way into a home without announcing themselves. This was once considered constitutionally dubious. But the Supreme Court has ruled that police may enter a house without knocking if they have “a reasonable suspicion” that announcing their presence would be dangerous or allow the suspect to destroy evidence (for example, by flushing drugs down the toilet).

Often these no-knock raids take place at night, accompanied by “flash-bang” grenades designed temporarily to blind, deafen and confuse their targets. They can go horribly wrong: Mr Balko has found more than 50 examples of innocent people who have died as a result of botched SWAT raids. Officers can get jumpy and shoot unnecessarily, or accidentally. In 2011 Eurie Stamps, the stepfather of a suspected drug-dealer but himself suspected of no crimes, was killed while lying face-down on the floor when a SWAT-team officer reportedly tripped, causing his gun to discharge.

Householders, on hearing the door being smashed down, sometimes reach for their own guns. In 2006 Kathryn Johnston, a 92-year-old woman in Atlanta, mistook the police for robbers and fired a shot from an old pistol. Police shot her five times, killing her. After the shooting they planted marijuana in her home. It later emerged that they had falsified the information used to obtain their no-knock warrant.

Big grants for big guns
Federal cash—first to wage war on drugs, then on terror—has paid for much of the heavy weaponry used by SWAT teams. Between 2002 and 2011 the Department of Homeland Security disbursed $35 billion in grants to state and local police. Also, the Pentagon offers surplus military kit to police departments. According to Mr Balko, by 2005 it had provided such gear to more than 17,000 law-enforcement agencies.

These programmes provide useful defensive equipment, such as body armour and helmets. But it is hard to see why Fargo, North Dakota—a city that averages fewer than two murders a year—needs an armoured personnel-carrier with a rotating turret. Keene, a small town in New Hampshire which had three homicides between 1999 and 2012, spent nearly $286,000 on an armoured personnel-carrier known as a BearCat. The local police chief said it would be used to patrol Keene’s “Pumpkin Festival and other dangerous situations”. A Reason-Rupe poll found that 58% of Americans think the use of drones, military weapons and armoured vehicles by the police has gone “too far”.

Because of a legal quirk, SWAT raids can be profitable. Rules on civil asset-forfeiture allow the police to seize anything which they can plausibly claim was the proceeds of a crime. Crucially, the property-owner need not be convicted of that crime. If the police find drugs in his house, they can take his cash and possibly the house, too. He must sue to get them back.

Many police departments now depend on forfeiture for a fat chunk of their budgets. In 1986, its first year of operation, the federal Asset Forfeiture Fund held $93.7m. By 2012, that and the related Seized Asset Deposit Fund held nearly $6 billion.

Mr Balko contends that these forfeiture laws are “unfair on a very basic level”. They “disproportionately affect low-income people” and provide a perverse incentive for police to focus on drug-related crimes, which “come with a potential kickback to the police department”, rather than rape and murder investigations, which do not. They also provide an incentive to arrest suspected drug-dealers inside their houses, which can be seized, and to bust stash houses after most of their drugs have been sold, when police can seize the cash.

Kara Dansky of the American Civil Liberties Union, who is overseeing a study into police militarisation, notices a more martial tone in recent years in the materials used to recruit and train new police officers. A recruiting video in Newport Beach, California, for instance, shows officers loading assault rifles, firing weapons, chasing suspects, putting people in headlocks and releasing snarling dogs.

This is no doubt sexier than showing them poring over paperwork or attending a neighbourhood-watch meeting. But does it attract the right sort of recruit, or foster the right attitude among serving officers? Mr Balko cites the T-shirts that some off-duty cops wear as evidence of a culture that celebrates violence (“We get up early to beat the crowds”; “You huff and you puff and we’ll blow your door down”).

Others retort that Mr Balko and his allies rely too much on cherry-picked examples of raids gone wrong. Tragic accidents happen and some police departments use their SWAT teams badly, but most use them well, says Lance Eldridge, a former army officer and ex-sheriff’s deputy in Colorado.

It would be easier to determine who is right if police departments released more information about how and how often they deploy SWAT teams. But most are extremely cagey. In 2009 Maryland’s governor, Martin O’Malley, signed a law requiring the police in his state to report such information every six months. Three published reports showed that SWAT teams were most often deployed to serve search warrants on people suspected of crimes involving drugs and other contraband, but the law is set to expire this year. Utah’s legislature has passed a similar measure; it awaits the governor’s signature.

No one wants to eliminate SWAT teams. Imminent threats to human life require a swift, forceful response. That, say critics, is what SWAT teams should be used for: not for serving warrants on people suspected of nonviolent crimes, breaking up poker games or seeing that the Pumpkin Festival doesn’t get out of hand.
Anyway, I think it is pretty clear that something needs to change with police training. In individual incidents, the police are (in most cases) following proper protocol; the problem is that the protocol seems to be a massive over-reaction in most circumstances. There seems to be relatively little flexibility, and a general no-tolerance policy, that underlies a lot of these shootings.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Kamakazie Sith »

The medical examiner has completed the autopsy of Luis Rodriquez and has ruled it a homicide.

Source
The death of a man who struggled with police outside an Oklahoma movie theater was ruled a homicide on Wednesday, but the chief medical examiner said the injuries alone didn't cause the death.

Luis Rodriguez, 44, died as a result of cardiac arrhythmia due to physical restraint and an underlying heart condition, Amy Elliott, spokeswoman for the Chief Medical Examiner's Office said in a statement.

"Postmortem examination revealed evidence of a physical struggle; however, the noted injuries and associated hemorrhages are not sufficient by themselves to cause the decedent's death," Elliott wrote in an email about the findings.


Early on Feb. 15, police responded to a report of a domestic disturbance outside a Moore theater and tried to question Rodriguez, Moore Police Chief Jerry Stillings has said. Rodriguez was pepper-sprayed before five officers used two pairs of handcuffs to restrain him as he was face down on the ground, Stillings said.

Rodriguez's wife, Nair, had told media outlets that police beat her husband. Nair Rodriguez and other family members also released partial video of the incident, which showed police handcuffing Rodriguez as he lies on his stomach. He's later placed on a stretcher.

Michael Brooks-Jimenez, a lawyer for Nair Rodriguez, said in a statement after the autopsy results were released Wednesday that they were confident the death would be ruled a homicide. He added that they are researching the medical terminology in the autopsy and will have additional statements later. He asks that the family be able to accept the news in peace.

Three Moore police officers were placed on administrative leave following the incident.

Jeremy Lewis, Moore police spokesman, said the three officers will remain on leave until the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation completes its investigation and presents the findings to the Cleveland County District Attorney.

The Cleveland County District Attorney's office said they are aware the autopsy results have been released but are awaiting the OSBI investigation.

OSBI spokeswoman Jessica Brown said the autopsy results are just one aspect to the investigation and there is no timeline on when the investigation will be completed.

The nearly six-minute video shot by Nair Rodriguez shows five officers restraining Rodriguez face down on the ground, with one officer holding his head down. Once they have him in handcuffs, a police officer comes over and starts talking to Nair Rodriguez about the incident. She acknowledges she hit her 19-year-old daughter, and the officer explains that Luis Rodriguez became uncooperative and refused to give his ID.

Luis Rodriguez is then seen propped up in a seated position against the legs of an officer before he is placed on a stretcher.
The police released a statement following this decision. They said that actual report indicated "minimal physical trauma". Hopefully the actual report will eventually be available for review. A spokesman for the ME Office also added that in respect to autopsy homicide is a medical term that does not denote wrong doing or criminal intent.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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http://dissenter.firedoglake.com/2014/0 ... in-throat/#
A mother in Huntsville, Alabama, filed a wrongful death lawsuit against police alleging that they were responsible for killing her son during a drug sting.

The lawsuit claims that Huntsville police in civilian clothes violently threw Nancy Smith’s 17-year-old son to the ground. He was handcuffed and pepper sprayed. While lying motionless on the ground, the officers allegedly shoved their knees into his back making it difficult for him to breathe. The officers later shoved a “sharp instrument” into his throat while he was choking and also broke his ribs.

As the lawsuit argues, the actions of police were “so extreme and outrageous in nature as to shock the conscience of the community.” They were “willful, malicious and intentional as to inflict terror and trauma upon a Huntsville citizen.”

The teen was hospitalized for five days with severe injuries before he died on June 18, 2013.

On June 13, police allegedly “set up” an 18-year-old confidential informant to purchase drugs from this teen at his parents’ home. The teen’s mother had no idea that police in civilian clothes would surround her house ready to pounce on her son to make an arrest.

Without any warning or “lawful command,” a female police officer allegedly ran toward the teen, who was unarmed. He was thrown to the ground, handcuffed and pepper sprayed in the face. He was “choking uncontrollably” and an officer eventually called the paramedics.

The teen apparently lost “consciousness” while choking as officers “refused to remove” the handcuffs so he could “sit upright to attempt to breathe.”

Officers claimed to have tried to “retrieve” the bag before paramedics arrived. “Without proper training or expertise,” officers next “shoved a sharp oblong object into” the teen’s throat.

Officers allegedly told the paramedics the teen had “swallowed a bag of drugs” when he was thrown to the ground. That caused him to choke. At the hospital, the paramedics informed the doctor the teen “appeared lifeless and had no pulse.”

“No bag was found or recovered from the scene nor was a bag found or retrieved from the hospital” where the teen was treated. He died there five days later.

The teen’s mother requested a copy of the autopsy report, but, according to the lawsuit, she was denied. However, according to local news media, who obtained a copy, the cause of death was “undetermined.” Blood samples were thrown out before the autopsy was performed. So all the report indicates is that he could have died from an “asphyxial event,” a “foreign object in his throat,” or “from the way he was restrained.”

The alleged conduct of police is stunning. That a police officer would allegedly tell what was a lie to paramedics—that he swallowed a bag of drugs—and then it turns out shoved something sharp into his throat while he is choking as a way to cover up police brutality is sadistic behavior. But it is representative of how the War on Drugs is waged in America.

In 2006, police in Atlanta executed a “no knock” search warrant on 92 year-old Kathryn Johnston’s home. She thought her home was being invaded and fired a shot. The police shot her 39 times and then planted marijuana in her home to help justify the violence. They raided the woman’s home on the basis of “falsified paperwork.”

On June 11, 2010, Las Vegas police allegedly set up a drug raid on Trevon Cole’s home as part of a reality television series. Cole allegedly sold an eighth ounce of marijuana to an undercover officer, which led officers to raid his apartment where he was living with his nine months pregnant fiancee. They found him in the bathroom and believed he was flushing marijuana down the toilet. He allegedly made some kind of movement and was fatally shot by police.

Pastor Jonathan Paul Ayers was killed by police involved in an undercover sting operation. An unmarked black SUV with armed men dressed in street clothes, who turned out to be agents in Georgia’s drug task force, pulled up behind Ayers’ vehicle. He tried to escape what he likely thought was a car jacking. An agent shot and killed him. He became a target because he was ministering a woman who was being pursued by the drug task force. (For more examples, Students for Sensible Drug Policy compiled a list of victims in the War on Drugs here.)

This kind of brutality and vigilantism is part of the culture of the War on Drugs among police, federal agents and other public and private security officers. No matter how many times the culture is brought out into the open and challenged through lawsuits or Justice Department investigations, officers involved often escape jail time and avoid having to take responsibility for their actions.

The culture survives as a feature of a War on Drugs that disproportionately targets people of color but can ultimately kill anyone, regardless of color, who gets in the way.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Edi »

Stories related to police abuse of power and similar issues should be posted in this thread, just like the gay marriage issues and North Korea issues are posted in their respective general threads. We don't need a dozen separate topics for every little issue. Obviously things like the Ferguson protests deserve their own dedicated thread, but smaller stories belong here.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by madd0ct0r »

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... ldren.html

much as I hate a dailymail link
A 27-year-old mother of two has been fatally shot by an off-duty sheriff's deputy after he suspected her of shoplifting at a Houston Walmart.
Harris County Sheriff's deputies have said that victim Shelly Frey, Tisa Andrews and Yolanda Craig were stealing when they were confronted by Louis Campbell a 26-year veteran of the force who works as a security guard at the store.
According to Campbell the women ran to their car and when he rushed to open the door, they accelerated away - at which point he fired the deadly shot into the car which hit Frey in the neck.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Trigger-happy much?
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Borgholio »

What makes policing so effective in places such as the UK where most officers aren't armed? Is it a function of how restrictive the gun laws are that allow officers to be *reasonably* safe from being shot and thus not needing a gun themselves? Or is it something else?

Interestingly as well, London police actually voted against being armed on multiple occasions. I don't think that would happen here in the states...many PDs would want even more and even bigger guns.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Elheru Aran »

Lack of a long history of being essentially an institution of public rent-a-thugs serving at the beck and call of public governments to oppress minorities is a big part of it. The UK police has generally (not always) been fairly stringent in serving the public rather than enforcing laws specifically designed to oppress a significant percentage of the population.

The gun laws do help, too. Cops in the UK are a lot less likely to get shot. Stabbed, yeah-- hence why when you see them on the tube they've always got those fancy stab vests on-- but not so much shot at. That's why there's always a ridiculously disproportionate response when someone's walking around with a gun in the UK, we've had a few threads on that IIRC.

The social thing is the bigger part of it, though...
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Thanas »

The UK police cracked down a lot on leftist activists throughout its history.

However, the social net and anti-gun laws when combined make a big difference.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Batman »

I don't suppose there's any attempts to try that mall cop for murdering a person for shoplifting. Yeah. You steal stuff from Wal-Mart. That's definitely something you deserve to be killed for.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Batman wrote:I don't suppose there's any attempts to try that mall cop for murdering a person for shoplifting. Yeah. You steal stuff from Wal-Mart. That's definitely something you deserve to be killed for.
He didn't shoot her for shoplifting. He merely escalated the situation by putting himself into a position to be run over as she fled, which is debatable if he was ever in any danger. Even after not being run over, he felt the use of deadly force was still warranted as she fled the scene. I mean, it's not like cars have license plates for identification or anything: shoplifting is serious fucking business.

On a sad note, I wonder if she was honestly thinking: "I can get away, he's not crazy enough to actually shoot me!" Showed her, am I right?

Remember that stupid CHL holder who did the same thing: shot at a fleeing shoplifter, then claimed they tried to run him over even though he was only in danger because he put himself in the way? I bet he's doing plenty of time now, as he should be. I'm not holding my breath on this one. Even off duty, cops can get away with a lot of shit. And seeing the picture of the deceased, it doesn't surprise me she was shot. Houston cops have been beating and blasting a whole load of unarmed minorities for a long time.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by madd0ct0r »

holy shit. One man's life is now worth less then the right and duty of a minor deputy to answer emails* while driving.

* but only work related emails, becuase everyone knows that's how people communicate really really urgent things.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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NYPD will make sure to drag you outside before sexually assaulting you
A Brooklyn cop kicked a 10-year-old boy in the shin, breaking his leg, as the child was recording him with his cell phone, according to court papers.

Cops were responding to Krystle Silvera’s Flatbush home looking for her ex-boyfriend in connection to violating an order of protection, according to Silvera’s lawsuit, which also contains disturbing allegations that she was sexually abused by a cop.

Krystle’s son Courtney Silvera was eating his breakfast cereal when the cops began knocking on the door.

The visit soon spiraled out of control shortly after cops began pounding on the front door at 7 a.m. on Jan. 30, 2013, according to the complaint filed in Brooklyn Federal Court.

Silvera’s 61-year-old mother, who is suffering from brain and lung cancer, answered the door but had difficulty understanding the cops’ reason for being there, the suit said.

The curious child went to see what was going on, grabbed his mother’s cell phone and began recording the commotion.

“The police had come to our house before (due to the domestic violence complaint) and he’s fascinated by the police, he looks up to them,” Silvera, 30, a nursing student at Long Island University, told the Daily News.

But the cop apparently didn’t like being recorded and began assaulting the child, the suit said.

“I heard my son screaming, ‘You can’t do that! You’re hurting me! Don’t hit me!’ ” she said.

The mother had been upstairs getting her 5-year-old daughter ready for school. She bolted downstairs into the fray, dressed in her underclothes, and was grabbed by a cop who pulled her outside in the freezing cold, the suit alleges.

While Silvera was being restrained, her breast popped out of her bra revealing a pierced nipple, according to the suit.

“The officer flicked the piercing, he flicked the ring up with his finger on my right breast,” she said. “He said, ‘Is this what mothers look like these days?’

“My neighbors saw me naked. It was degrading. I can deal with the embarrassment of what (the police) did to me in front of my neighbors, but the hardest thing is explaining to my kids that not all police are bad,” she added.

Silvera was charged with assaulting the cops and released two days later on $1,500 bail.

When she returned home, Courtney’s leg was black-and-blue and swollen, she said. The boy was taken to Kings County Medical Center, where an X-ray showed his leg was fractured.

But Courtney’s dream of becoming a detective someday hasn’t been shattered.

“I told my mom being a detective would be cool,” the youngster said.
Exported.; Handout The cop apparently didn’t like being recorded and began assaulting the child, the suit said.

“I want to be a better detective than the one who did this.”

An NYPD spokeswoman said the Internal Affairs Bureau has opened an investigation based on the allegations in the suit.

Three of the officers were treated and released at Maimonides Hospital for minor injuries following the incident, the department said.

“I’ve seen a lot of police brutality cases, but nothing as low as this, kicking a 10-year-old boy,” said the family’s lawyer, Anthony Ofodile.

Silvera, who later pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct, is seeking unspecified monetary damages for the alleged civil rights violations.

The cell phone captured sounds and voices during the confrontations but the video image is herky-jerky from the struggle.

Silvera said her son was briefly handcuffed, but when cops learned he was only 10-years-old, they removed the restraints.

Both of her children have been traumatized by the incident, she said.

The cops were from the Warrants Division and the 63rd Precinct in Flatlands.
So, beat the kid for filming while inside his own home. Drag the mother outside and sexually assult her, then charge her with disorderly conduct.

I like how you can be shot for sexual assault in Texas, but NYPD probably uses it as an ice-breaker. And as far as I know, it's illegal to drag someone outside their home without a warrant or probable cause. The key term is "probable cause" which of course the cops likely explained as "she resisted as we illegally dragged her out of her home, but it's ok because we got her to plead guilty instead of fighting a costly court battle in lieu of taking care of her dieing mother and two children."

This is specifically why you don't let police in your house without a warrant. I would go as far as not even opening the door. This however has the secondary issue of having to be violated and replace a door-frame after they smash their way in. The violation part is easy, the cops will handle that, but installing a door and frame is a mother-fucker. I mean, just nailing it up is easy, but you have to check your squar.... oh sorry, I got sidetracked rather than dealing with the idea a human being thinking it's ok to flick someone's nipple while they have them in custody.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

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Dailymail
Deputy who killed former Napster COO after drifting into the bike lane while distracted by his laptop will NOT face charges because he was answering a work-related email

California prosecutors have declined to file charges against a sheriff's deputy who struck and killed a prominent entertainment attorney and former Napster executive with his patrol car last year.

Deputy Andrew Wood was apparently distracted by his mobile digital computer when his patrol car drifted into the bike lane, running over cyclist Milton Olin Jr.

Olin, a 65-year-old attorney and former chief operating officer of the online file-sharing service Napster, was riding in Calabasas in December when he was hit.

Prosecutors said in a letter released Wednesday and cited by Los Angeles Daily News that because Wood was acting within the course of his duties when typing into his computer, criminal charges are not warranted.

Under the law, law enforcement officials are allowed to use electronic wireless devices while carrying out their duties.

The victim’s family have filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the Sheriff's Department and accused Wood of negligence.

Olin’s loved ones also started an online petition on Change.org demanding that charges be brought against the deputy. So far, more than 67,000 people have signed.

Milton Olin, a married father of two, was riding his bike in the 22400 block of Mulholland Highway at around 1pm on December 8, 2013, when Deputy Wood's patrol car slammed into him.

Olin was pronounced dead at the scene and the deputy was taken to a hospital for treatment of minor injuries.

Wood was returning from a fire call at Calabasas High School and was on patrol when the accident occurred.

‘He was responding to a deputy who was inquiring whether the fire investigation had been completed,’ the letter from the prosecutor’s office stated. ‘Since Wood was acting within the course and scope of his duties when he began to type his response, under Vehicle Code section 23123.5, he acted lawfully.

‘Wood briefly took his eyes away from the road precisely when the narrow roadway curved slightly to the left without prior warning, causing him to inadvertently travel straight into the bike lane, immediately striking Olin.’

Olin, from Woodland Hills, had been a lawyer for 38 years and practiced business, labor and employment and intellectual property law from a firm he co-founded, Altschul & Olin LLC in Encino.

According to his LinkedIn profile, he was the COO of Napster between 2000 and 2002. Napster was a file sharing site for music before becoming an online music store.

Before his job with Napster, he worked for A&M Records as vice president of business development and was responsible for signing artists and acquiring music rights.

Olin is survived by his wife, Louise, and his two sons, Chris and Geoff. The family lived in a $1million home in Woodland Hills.

The attorney’s widow is currently working on getting off the ground the Milt Olin Foundation to raise awareness and help eliminate cycling-related fatalities.
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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Havok »

I posted that a little ways up there Kuja. I didn't add the quote box.

But yeah, turns out cops can even kill old rich white men with impunity.

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Re: General Police Abuse Thread

Post by Rogue 9 »

There was a (non-fatal) police shooting in Evansville, IN this morning. According to the police department's own statements, the officer involved was immediately accused of brutality though they say he arrived at the scene of an ongoing shootout between two suspects. The officer was wearing a body camera, and they released the footage, saying they normally wouldn't at this stage of the investigation but wished to avoid Ferguson-style unrest. Here it is.



Frankly, it's pretty damned unclear, though I'm fairly certain the first two shots heard weren't his, since the shots that followed up, presumably from his pistol, were much louder to the camera. At any rate, that's probably about what you can expect from police body cams in a violent situation; no matter how good they are, they'll be shaken around and reoriented so much that you won't get a good picture.
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