Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

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The Romulan Republic
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Re: Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-07-21 06:59am

Alferd Packer wrote:
2019-07-21 06:34am
Well, that pragmatist in me sees it going like this: he finishes TWoW in the next year or so. He begins working in earnest on ADoS, but dies before he can finish it. Whoever is in charge of his estate commissions an author to use what was written and what notes exist to finish the book, and we eventually, many years down the road, get that as our conclusion. It's closer than the show, but it's not 100% GRRM.
Unless he wills that his unfinished notes get destroyed, like Terry Pratchett did.
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Re: Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

Post by Solauren » 2019-07-21 05:08pm

Alternate: It's already finished, he's just taking his time releasing it for his own amusement.
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Re: Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-07-21 09:34pm

Solauren wrote:
2019-07-21 05:08pm
Alternate: It's already finished, he's just taking his time releasing it for his own amusement.
Somehow, I doubt he'd pass up that much money just for the pleasure of trolling his fan base.
"We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"-The Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, 1776.

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Re: Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

Post by Solauren » 2019-07-21 10:01pm

The Romulan Republic wrote:
2019-07-21 09:34pm
Solauren wrote:
2019-07-21 05:08pm
Alternate: It's already finished, he's just taking his time releasing it for his own amusement.
Somehow, I doubt he'd pass up that much money just for the pleasure of trolling his fan base.
Drive up anticipation to drive up sales.
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Re: Game Of Thrones: Final Season --SPOILERS!

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-08-13 11:57pm

The theory that Drogon destroyed the Iron Throne for symbolic reasons/because he understood that it had corrupted Danny is debunked by the script:

https://ca.ign.com/articles/2019/07/31/ ... nes-finale
With the final season of Game of Thrones earning a heap of Emmy nominations, the script to the series finale episode “The Iron Throne” has been made publicly available online. After giving the script a read, we found the answer to one of the more perplexing questions that came out of the final episode: why did Drogon melt the Iron Throne?

It’s been demonstrated that dragons are of high intelligence, but it seemed a stretch that the great beast would understand the importance of a geopolitical symbol and that his mother’s desire for it is what ultimately led to her demise. As it turns out, Drogon didn’t intentionally melt the throne. It was a complete accident.

The script, penned by showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, details how Drogon finds Jon over Daenerys’ dead body, becomes enraged, and readies a breath of fire. In that moment, we learn that “Drogon wants to burn the world but he will not kill Jon” and instead “He breathes fire on the back wall, blasting down what remains of the great red blocks of stone.” The script even clarifies that the Iron Throne was “not the target of Drogon’s wrath, just a dumb bystander caught up in the conflagration.”

So there you have it. It seems Drogon just wanted to vent his rage and the chair just happened to be in the way. Of course, while Drogon didn’t “mean” to destroy the Iron Throne, the showrunners clearly wanted to find a dramatic way of eliminating that object of power to symbolize the end of the “game of thrones

” that the characters had been embroiled in for years, so it was going to be destroyed one way or another. Are you pleased with how they did it? Let us know in the comments.
Yep, him toasting the Throne and not Jon is as random and vapid as it appeared at first glance, just like so much else in this finale.

Also, the Comic-Con panel, which several expected attendees dropped out of following an online campaign to heckle the cast and crew. And as much as I hate the show, I must say that that is potentially crossing a line, including a legal one, depending on exactly what sort of behaviour they were trying to instigate.

https://vanityfair.com/hollywood/2019/0 ... rya-theory
Last month, when HBO first announced that some of the cast and crew of Game of Thrones would attend San Diego Comic-Con after a divisive final season, the network promised a stacked roster of talent, including creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss—along with Jacob Anderson (Grey Worm), John Bradley (Samwell Tarly), Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Jaime Lannister), Liam Cunningham (Davos Seaworth), Nathalie Emmanuel (Missandei), Iain Glen (Ser Jorah Mormont), Conleth Hill (Varys), Maisie Williams (Arya Stark), Isaac Hempstead Wright (Bran Stark), and executive producer and frequent director Miguel Sapochnik. But after an ugly online movement to heckle the panel started gaining steam, Weiss, Benioff, Emmanuel, Glen, and Sapochnik all dropped out—most citing scheduling conflicts.
I'm torn between empathy at them for wanting to avoid possible harassment and irritation at people who blame actors for writing decisions, and the feeling that frankly, these chicken shits should have had the guts to stand up in front of their audience and justify their choices (even if I know that nothing good would have come of them trying to do so).
The remaining cast members who braved the crowd in San Diego’s Hall H on Friday were a somewhat defensive bunch. (Who can blame them?) The panel kicked off with an unprecedented call for civility from Comic-Con director of programming Eddie Ibrahim. Mostly answering softball “what if” questions from their moderator, the cast did manage to clear up one or two lingering mysteries from the controversial season eight.

Williams provided the most valuable moment of clarity when she debunked, without hesitation, the notion that Arya Stark had any help whatsoever in defeating the Night King in episode three. A flimsy (and frankly rather misogynistic) theory—based, I suppose, on the fandom’s expectation that Jon Snow might do something more useful in that battle beyond screaming at an undead dragon—proposed that Arya’s cousin had intentionally distracted Viserion in order to let Arya by. “NO,” Williams said. We can, of course, consider the Battle of Winterfell a team effort; after all, Melisandre did a hard night’s work. But the ultimate kill, here, goes to Arya and Arya alone.
Good. The final season is misogynist enough without taking Arya's big moment and giving credit to a man.
Meanwhile, Conleth Hill confirmed what many fans had suspected: Lord Varys was trying to poison Daenerys there at the end. (That’s why, if you recall, he asked a little serving girl at Dragonstone if the queen was eating, and said that they would “try again” later.) Hill went on to call Daenerys “cray-cray,” which won’t earn him any points with remaining Targaryen loyalists. The actor also took a curious and somewhat Trumpian stance on the outcry surrounding the final season, claiming that the “hate” it drew was led by the media, and that the loyal fans at SDCC proved that was the case.
:evil:

It is deeply disheartening to me to see how a number of the cast, as well as of course the show runners, have attempted to defend this farce by spewing yet more misogynistic attacks on Daenerys's character. Its understandable that an actor would want to defend a role they'd invested so much time in, of course, but I can't help but think how every such comment from her long-time colleagues probably feels like a fresh stab in the back to Emilia Clarke, who was clearly deeply invested in her character.
Entertainment Weekly’s James Hibberd, who was moderating the panel, echoed this sentiment when he claimed that an interview he conducted with Hill, which painted the actor as dissatisfied with his character’s end, was blown out of proportion by other outlets.
Not having read said interview, I cannot comment.
Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, on the other hand, had a more sanguine attitude about the fandom’s relationship with the show’s ending. While he spoke out months ago against a very silly fan-generated petition that lobbied HBO to remake season eight, he also said that it was fine to dislike the show’s ending—just as long as the complaints about the show didn’t turn into personal attacks on its creators. Case in point: When the actor said that he thought Jaime’s death in the arms of his sister-lover, Cersei, was “perfect,” someone in the crowd shouted out “liar!” Coster-Waldau’s eyebrows shot up in response. The end of a show you love, he pointed out to the Hall H crowd, will always piss you off.
Wow.

Given that he previously got some negative press for trying to defend the scene where Jaime raped Cersei (saying that he didn't see it as rape), my sympathy is very limited.
To keep things as gentle as possible for the cast, the moderator mostly fed the actors “what if” questions during the hour-long panel. Would Arya and Gendry ever get together in the future? Williams said no; Arya is a “lone wolf” and would never be with a partner.
I personally feel that this is somewhat out of keeping with Arya's previously established character, in which her loyalty to family is a major factor. But at least she torpedoed Arya/Gendry.
What’s Grey Worm up to? Anderson said he’s building a Wakandan-esque society on Naath. (Watch out for the butterflies.)
Trying to steal the MCU's glory?
Would Brienne have taken Jaime back if he had survived and Cersei didn’t? Coster-Waldau said no, Jaime had too much baggage.
Not sure how I feel about him presuming to speak for another actor's character, when he's not the writer or director, but I'm glad he credits Brienne with not being a total doormat.
The panel also featured a smattering of self-aware jabs at some non-story-based controversies from season eight. When the cast took the stage, for example, there were coffee cups on the table in front of them, and a few actors took some joking sips. Later, John Bradley swore that one of the water bottles that snuck into the finale right behind his foot wasn’t his. He’s right-handed, he pointed out, and so the bottle would have been on the other side of his chair. Liam Cunningham, for his part, said that the other bottle that was by his foot wasn’t his either. The world may never know who was so thirsty that day.

But perhaps the biggest mood moment of the panel belonged to Jacob Anderson, who chose to pull a Spider-Man mask over his face rather than answer a question about why Grey Worm didn’t kill Jon Snow after Jon killed Daenerys. “Grey Worm was just tired of it all,” Anderson laughingly deflected through the mask. That’s the San Diego Comic-Con version of “no comment” if ever I’ve heard one.
If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all? :)
Rather than ending with the customary audience Q&A, the moderator merely shut the panel down, and the cast exited the stage. Would the crowd get all the Game of Thrones answers they so craved? To quote Williams’s favorite line from the show: “Not today.”
While perhaps understandable under the circumstances, the fact that they refused audience questions speaks volumes about the response to the show's finale, and the inability of its creators to defend it.

Still, credit at least to those on the panel for having the guts to show up, unlike the most guilty parties, the show runners themselves.
"We hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness"-The Declaration of Independence, Thomas Jefferson, 1776.

A promise never lived up to, but always to be aspired to.

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