DrakaFic: General Information

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DrakaFic: General Information

Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 02:25am

Links to Stories

Timeline

Yosemite Bear
Here there be Dragons

Norseman
Blood is Thicker than Water
Mission to Moscow
The Early Propaganda War 1938-1941

Sheppard
The Great Patriotic War
Operation Noah's Hammer
Night of the Superforts
The Yanks Are Coming!

ATMahan
Cuchulainn’s Hounds

Lonestar
Caribbean Beat
Sweet and Honorable

Duchess of Zeon
A Conversation
A Speech
Across the Marco Polo Bridge
Araby
Dastam râ begir
The Charge
Riding with the Red Guard

Pablo Sanchez
The Al Aqaba Roundtable

Domination of Draka Rank System

Citizen Enlisted
E-1 Junior Monitor - Private (just joined)
E-2 Monitor - Corporal (some experience)
E-3 Decurion - Sergeant
E-4 Senior Decurion (no enlisted ranks beyond this because by
this point, you should be an officer or you're a retard, in their view)

Citizen Officers
O-1 Tetrarch (2nd Lt / Ensign)
O-2 Senior Tetrarch (1st Lt / Lieutenant JG)
O-3 Centurion (Captain / Lieutenant)
O-4 Cohortarch (Major / Lt Commander)
O-5 Junior Merarch (LT Colonel / Commander)
O-6 Senior Merarch (Colonel / Captain)
O-7 Junior Chiliarch (Brig. Gen / Rear Adm (Lower) )
O-8 Senior Chilliarch (Major Gen / Rear Adm (Upper))
O-9 Junior Strategos (Lt General/ Vice Admiral)
O-10 Strategos ( General /Admiral )
O-11 Senior Strategos (Colonel General / Marshal )
O-12 Arch Strategos ( Field Marshal / General of the Army )
O-13 Dominarch (Chief of the Supreme General Staff)

Janissary Ground Ranks

E-1: Recruit (first 6 months)
E-2: Trooper
E-3: Senior Trooper
E-4: Corporal (specialist for operating machinery, usually drivers, etc)
E-5: Sergeant
E-6: Color Sergeant
E-7: Master Sergeant

Janissary Naval Ranks

(NOTE: Insert Petty Officer for Sergeant - they can't call a JANISSARY
an OFFICER after all)

E-1: Seaman Recruit (First Six Months)
E-2: Seaman
E-3: Senior Seaman
E-4: Sergeant 3rd Class
E-5: Sergeant 2nd Class
E-6: Sergeant 1st Class
E-7: Chief Sergeant

Domination of Draka Unit System

Stick Commanded by a Monitor, has 4 men
Lochos Commanded by a Decurion, has 8 men and is equivalent to a squad
Tetrarchy Commanded by a Tetrarch, has 33 men and is equivalent to a platoon
Century Commanded by a Centurion, has 110 men and is equivalent to a company
Cohort Commanded by a Cohortarch, has 500 men and is equivalent to a battalion
Merarchy Commanded by a Merarch, has 1,500 men and is equivalent to a regiment
Chilliarchy Commanded by a Chiliarch, has 4,500 men and is equivalent to a brigade
Legion Commanded by a Strategos, has 13,000 men and is equivalent to a division
Last edited by MKSheppard on 2005-01-31 04:37pm, edited 4 times in total.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 02:25am

Deleted as no longer necessary
Last edited by MKSheppard on 2004-12-20 03:59am, edited 1 time in total.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 02:26am

USN Battleline OOB circa 1940

All of the 14" gunned BBs have been retired or regunned to 16".

This is a TL where theWashington treaty and London treaty never
took effect, so the battlelines are much more modern than in our TL,
and we have12,000 ton to 15,000 ton heavy cruisers as common place.

Pennsylvania Class (31,400, 12 x 14", 21 kts)
BB-38 Pennsylvania (Reserve Fleet)
BB-39 Arizona (Reserve Fleet)

New Mexico Class (32,000, 8 x 16", 21 kts)
BB-40 New Mexico (Reserve Fleet - NOTE: has 12 x 14" Guns)
BB-41 Mississippi
BB-42 Idaho

Tennesee Class (32,300 tons, 8 x 16", 21 kts)
BB-43 Tennessee
BB-44 California

(New Mexico and Tennesee classes refitted to carry 16"
guns bringing them up to virtual Colorado-standard during
the late 1920s)

Colorado class battleships (32,600 tons, 8 x 16", 21 kts)
BB-45 Colorado
BB-46 Maryland
BB-47 Washington
BB-48 West Virginia

South Dakota class (43,200 tons, 12 x 16", 23 kts)
BB-49 South Dakota
BB-50 Indiana
BB-51 Montana
BB-52 North Carolina
BB-53 Iowa
BB-54 West Indies

Lexington Class BCs (44,638 tons, 8 x 16", 33 kts)
CC-1 Lexington
CC-2 Constellation
CC-3 Saratoga
CC-4 Ranger
CC-5 Constitution

Arkansas-class BBs 12 x 16" (1925 Order)

BB-55 Arkansas
BB-56 New Jersey
BB-57 Missouri
BB-58 Cuba
BB-59 Illinois
BB-60 Kentucky

Chesapeake Class BCs (48,638 tons, 8 x 16", 33 kts)
CC-7 Chesapeake
CC-8 President
CC-9 Constitution
CC-10 Wasp

Florida Class BBs (9 x 18", 26 kts)

(1928 Order, came just before the Depression, so weren't
cancelled, due to them providing jobs in politically important
states. When completed, these allowed the retirement of the
older Standards.)

BB-61 Florida
BB-62 Maine
BB-63 Sonora
BB-64 Oregon
BB-65 Puerto Rico
BB-66 Alaska

Ships to be built under the Two Ocean Navy Bill:

Virginia Class BBs (9 x 18", 26 kts)

BB-67 Virginia (building)
BB-68 Alabama (building)
BB-69 Ohio (building)
BB-70 South Carolina (Building)
BB-71 North Dakota (Building)
BB-72 Vermont (Building)
BB-73 Texas (Building, Originally named Rhode Island, renamed due to immense pressure
from Texan congressional delegation, despite the fact that BB-35 was at the Naval Reserve Fleet at
Galveston, TX at the time of naming, has been moved to the Texas State Milita since then, allowing
the renaming, USN not very happy about this)
BB-74 Nebraska (Building)
BB-75 Georgia (Planned)
BB-76 Phillipines (Planned)
BB-77 Delaware (Planned)

26 Battleships, 9 Battlecruisers , 35 capital ships total currently in fleet,
3 Old 14" BBs in reserve.

When Two Ocean Navy Bill is completed, USN will have 36 BBs, and 9 BCs
for a total of 45 Capital Ships.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 02:26am

Soviet Naval OOB as of 1940

(4) Dmitriy Donskoy class BBs
Dmitryi Donskoy
Stenka Razin
Spartacus
Stephen Douglas

(4) Petrapavlovsk Class BB
Oktyabrskaya Revolutsia (scrapping)
Parishskaya Kommuna (scrapping)
Marat (Sent to Black Sea Fleet)
Mikhail Frunze (Sent to Black Sea Fleet)

(40 from 1935-36 +4 more building) Gnevny Class DDs
(2,400 tons, 38.6 kts, 4 x 130mm, 2 x 76mm, 6 x 21" Torp)

(10 Bulding in 1939, to commision in 1942-43) Osmotritelny DDs
(2,860 tons, 36.5 kts, 4 x 130mm, 2 x 76mm, 6 x "21)

(2 from 1935) Kirov CAs
(9,400 tons, 35.9 kts, 9 x 180mm, 6 x 100mm, 6 x "21)
Kirov (lost)
Voroshilov

(18 Laid down in 1939, commisioning in 1942) Chapayev CLs
(14,100 tons 32.5 kts, 12 x 152mm, 8 x 100mm, 10 x "21)

Total Soviet Navy List as of 1940:
6 BBs
7 CAs (1 lost)
(18 CLs building, to be ready in 1942)
40 DDs (14 building)
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 01:09pm

USAAF OOBs in 1945

Groups

Very heavy bomb group
3 squadrons, 45 B-29, 60 crews, 11 men per crew, 2,078 officers and men in group.

Heavy bomb group
4 squadrons, 72 aircraft (B-17/24), 96 crews, 9 to 11 men per crew, 2,261 officers and men in group.

(In @, until October 1943, BGs sent 10-20 aircraft on each mission. In October 1943, the
96th BG sent 42 B-17s to Schweinfurt and began to do this regularly. Through November
and December 1943, the other BGs began to send 30-50 bombers as well)

Medium bomb group
4 squadrons, 96 aircraft (B-25/26), 96 crews, 5 to 6 men per crew, 1,759 officers and men in group.

(In @, the B-26 units first dispatched 54 a/c in September 1943, up from the then-usual 36)

Light bomb group
4 squadrons, 96 aircraft (A-20/26), 96 crews, 3 to 4 men per crew, 1,304 officers and men in group.

Single Engine Fighter Group
3 squadrons, 108-126 aircraft (P-40/47/51), 108-126 pilots, 994 officers and men in group.

(In @, early 1943, the average numbers of fighters a FG sent was around 25-35. By Late '43
it was 35-45, and in early 1944, FGs began sending out 60~ and above a/c)

Twin Engine Fighter Group
3 squadrons, 108-126 aircraft (P-38), 108-126 pilots, 1,081 officers and men in group.

Troop Carrier Group
4 squadrons, 80-110 aircraft (C-47), 128 crews, 4 to 5 men per crew, 1,837 men in group.

Combat Cargo Group
4 squadrons, 125 aircraft (C-46/47), 150 crews, 4 men per crew, 883 men in group.

Squadrons

Night fighter squadron
18 aircraft (P-61/70), 16 crews, 2 to 3 men per crew, 288 officers and men in squadron.

Tactical reconnaissance squadron
27 aircraft (various including F-6), 23 pilots, 233 men in squadron.

Photographic reconnaissance squadron
24 aircraft (F-5), 21 pilots, 347 men in squadron.

Combat mapping squadron
18 aircraft (F-7/9), 16 crews, 9 men per crew, 474 officers and men in squadron.

USAAF OOBs in 1944

Heavy Bomb Group:
48 aircraft in 4 squadrons of 12 each (B-17 or B-24)
Squadron Complement: 67 Officers, 360 E.M.
Group HQ: 25 Officers, 57 E.M., 1 W.O.
Total Group: 293 Officers, 1497 E.M., 1 W.O.

Medium Bomb Group:
64 aircraft, 4 Squadrons of 16 each (A-20, B-25, B-26)
Squadron Complement: 67 Officers, 310 E.M.
Group HQ: 25 Officers, 57 E.M., 1 W.O.
Total Group: 293 Officers, 1287 E.M., 1 W.O.

Fighter Group, Single Engine:
75 aircraft, 3 squadrons of 25 each
Squadron Complement: 39 Officers, 245 E.M.
Group HQ: 27 Officers, 70 E.M., 1 W.O.
Total Group: 144 Officers, 805 E.M., 1 W.O.

Fighter Group, Twin Engine:
75 aircraft, 3 squadrons of 25 each
Squadron Complement: 39 Officers, 274 E.M.
Group HQ: 27 Officers, 70 E.M., 1 W.O.
Total Group: 144 Officers, 892 E.M., 1 W.O.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 03:12pm

AFVs of the DrakaFicverse

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Image
T-31
76.2mm F-34
Armor:
90mm Effective Hull Front
70mm Effective Turret Front
60mm Effective Sides (Hull & Turret)

Image
T-34
85mm ZiS
Armor:
90mm Effective Hull Front
60mm Effective Hull Sides
100mm Effective Turret Front
80mm Effective Turret Sides

Image
LT-3
85mm ZiS
Armor:
120mm Effective Hull Front
90mm Effective Hull Sides
130mm Effective Turret Front
120mm Effective Turret Sides

Image
KS-1 M1939
122mm D-25T
Armor:
190mm Effective Hull Front
90mm Effective Hull Sides
120mm Effective Turret Front
100mm Effective Turret Sides

KS-1 M1940
100mm D-10
Armor:
190mm Effective Hull Front
90mm Effective Hull Sides
120mm Effective Turret Front
100mm Effective Turret Sides

Image
KS-2
100mm D-10
Armor:
260mm Effective Hull Front
110mm Effective Hull Sides
220mm Effective Turret Front
200mm Effective Turret Sides

Tank Destroyers

Image
SU-76
76.2mm F-34
Armor:
70mm Effective Hull Front
30mm Effective Hull Sides

Image
SU-85
85mm ZiS
Armor:
80mm Effective Hull Front
60mm Effective Hull Sides

Image
SU-100
100mm D-10
Armor:
90mm Effective Hull Front
60mm Effective Hull Sides

Assault Guns

Image
ISU-76
76.2mm F-34
Armor:
90mm Effective Hull Front
30mm Effective Hull Sides

Image
ISU-122
122mm D-25T
Armor:
140mm Effective Hull Front
90mm Effective Hull Sides

Image
ISU-152
152mm ML-20
Armor:
190mm Effective Hull Front
90mm Effective Hull Sides

Armored Cars & Light Tanks

Image
BA-64
7.62mm DT MG
Armor:
20mm Effective Hull Front
10mm Effective Hull Sides
10mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Image
T-60
20mm TNSh Autocannon
Armor:
40mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
20mm Effective Turret Front
20mm Effective Turret Sides

Domination of Draka

Hond IIC
(Older model given Armored Skirts to protect from RPGs and given
HEAT rounds and sent in combat to counter KS-1s)
90mm K1936 Main Gun
40 tons combat weight
36 km/h top speed
Armor:
80mm Effective Hull Front (60mm Base +10mm Applique +20mm Applique)
50mm Effective Hull Sides (40mm Base +10mm Applique)
100mm Effective Turret Front (80mm Base +10mm Applique +20mm Applique)
50mm Effective Turret Sides (40mm Base +10mm Applique)

Hond III
(The Hond III with Armored Skirts appears 3 months into the war)
100mm K1939 Main Gun
60 tons combat weight
48 km/h top speed
Armor:
100mm Effective Hull Front (130mm actual thickness)
80mm Effective Hull Sides
120mm Effective Turret Front (150mm actual thickness)
80mm Effective Turret Sides

Cheetah Airborne Tank
75mm K1936 (Low Recoil Variant)
Armor:
40mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
30mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Armored Personnel Carriers

Image
Peltast I
(Older Janissary Wheeled APC, is still around due to scarcity of Peltast IIs)
Carries 12 Janissaries
13mm MG (Open Topped)
Armor:
10mm Effective Hull Front
10mm Effective Hull Sides

Image
Peltast II
(New Janissary APC, very fast, has turret for MG)
Carries 12 Janissaries
13mm MG (Turreted)
Armor:
20mm Effective Hull Front
10mm Effective Hull Sides
20mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Hoplite II
20mm K1939 Autocannon
Carries 11 Citizens
Armor:
60mm Effective Hull Front
40mm Effective Hull Sides
50mm Effective Turret Front
30mm Effective Turret Sides

Armored Specialist Vehicles

Dragon II
(Armored Anti-Aircraft Vehicle)
2 x 20mm K1925 Autocannons
Armor:
60mm Effective Hull Front
40mm Effective Hull Sides
50mm Effective Turret Front
30mm Effective Turret Sides

Aardvark II
(Armored Engineer Vehicle)
155mm Spigot Mortar
Turret Mounted Flamethrower
Armor:
60mm Effective Hull Front
40mm Effective Hull Sides
50mm Effective Turret Front
30mm Effective Turret Sides

Javelin II
(Armored Mortar Vehicle)
120mm K1938 Automortar
Armor:
60mm Effective Hull Front
40mm Effective Hull Sides
50mm Effective Turret Front
30mm Effective Turret Sides

Proteus I
(Tank Destroyer on Modified Hond I chassis, produced 4 months into war)
90mm K1936 (Loaded with HEAT)
Armor:
30mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides

Self-Propelled Artillery

Leeu 105mm
Armor:
30mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
10mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Leeu 155mm
Armor:
30mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
10mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Leeu 175mm
Armor:
30mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
10mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides

Leeu 203mm
Armor:
30mm Effective Hull Front
20mm Effective Hull Sides
10mm Effective Turret Front
10mm Effective Turret Sides
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

User avatar
MKSheppard
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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-18 03:13pm

Small Arms of the Drakafic Universe


Domination of Draka

Rifles

T-1: Breech loading rifle, black powder vintage.

T-2: Lever action rifle, rapid fire, black poweder metallic cartridge rifle

T-3: Revolver Action Rifle, allowing longer cartridges than could be used with
a lever action system, draw back was the cartridges were exposed to the
elements and if they cooked off, goodbye hands.

T-4: Bolt Action Rifle; Copy of the German Mauser rifle, redesigned for
more rapid production, and cheapness.

T-5: Self Loading Rifle; Unreliable Self Loading Rifle, too bulky and heavy for use in
the field, etc, developed to replace the T-4, to avoid Royalty payments to MauserWerke.

T-6: SLR (1920s); Extensively modified T-5 that finally approached reliability standards
for a infantry small arm, considered inferior to the M-1 Garand in range, accuracy and
power, but 40% cheaper to manufacture.

T-7B: Selective Fire Rifle (1930s), T-6 modified to carry a much heavier reciever and
utilized a gas operated blow back system, firing full power cartridges, Draka trained
to fire in short bursts, as the longer range of the full power cartridge is deemed
necessary for action in Afghanistan and the Persian regions of the Domination to
enage the enemy at combat ranges equal to that of the opposition's arms. The
earlier version, the T-7A was a small caliber weapon, but it's range was found
lacking as Peshmerga guerillas in the eastern provinces could pick off entire
Citizen Force Sticks at ranges exceeding the effective use of the cartridge
for no loss to themselves.

T-7C: T-7B modified to remove the automatic fire capability and replace
it with a three shot burst system, further improvements in the design reduce the
cost and time needed to manufacture it.

SMGs

S-1 Submachine Gun

Developed in 1921 as a personal protective weapon that can be carried
by Citizens allowing them to hold off large numbers of enemy combatants
due to experience learned in the eastern provinces, and as glove box
compartment "life preserver". Chambered in the 10x15mm used in the
Tolgren Automatic Pistol of 1912

S-2 Submachine Gun

Experience shows that an even smaller weapon is needed for personal use
due to the extremely dangerous streets of Cario, and other Persian cities,
where islamic extremists continue to kidnap Citizens, despite the massive
penalties for harming a citizen (entire village impaled), for the S-1 is too bulky
for use in every situation. Kurenwohr Combine is given the contract, and they
produce the bakelite encased, steel reinforced S-2 submachine gun, firing
a 5mm hollowpoint cartridge from a 60 round banana magazine, at roughly
half the weight and significantly smaller size than the S-1. It remains an internal
security and personal protection weapon rather than a combat weapon due
to the poor range of the 5mm cartridge.

S-3 Submachine gun

Designed in Mid-1941 as a response to the Soviet PPSh-41 submachine gun,
utilizing the experience learned in producing the S-2, it fires a 7.62mm round,
allowing for much more stopping power and effective range than the S-2, while
allowing a smaller carried size than the S-1. The S-3 goes through several variations,
with the first utilizing a bakelite shell reinforced by steel inserts, like the S-2, but it
is found that the Bakelite cracks and becomes extremely brittle during the Russian
winter, so it is replaced by stamped steel pressings (S-3A)

Machine Guns

K1939 LMG
Developed to replace the aging K1924 LMG, the K1939 fires a 7mm round at
a cyclic rate of 1,000 RPM, versus the 870 of the K1924.

K1939 MMG
Same as LMG version, but on heavier tripod mount, allowing greater accuracy.

K1925 HMG
Fires a 13mm round at a cyclic rate of 400 RPM, replaced the older K1914 HMG.

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Rifles

Image
Samozaryadnaya Vintovka Tokareva obr 1938 (SVT-38)
Caliber: 7.62x54 mm R
Overall length: 1226 mm
Barrel length: 625 mm
Weight: 3.85 kg
Magazine: 10 round detachable box

Image
Mosin-Nagant M1891/30
Caliber: 7.62x54 mm R
Overall length: 1234 mm
Barrel length: 730 mm
Weight: 3.85 kg
Magazine: 5 round integral

SMGs

Image
Pistolet-Pulemyot Shpagina obr 1939 (PPSh-39)
Caliber: 7.62x25mm Soviet auto
Length: 838mm
Weight (unloaded): 3.64kg
Magazine: 35 round detachable box or 71 round drum
Rate of Fire: 900rpm

Anti-Tank Weapons

Image
PTRD antitank rifle
Caliber: 14.5mm
Overall length: 2000 mm
Weight: 17.3 kg
Magazine: Single Shot Bolt Action

Image
Raketniy Protivotankoviy Granatomet-1 (RPG-1)
Calibre: 60mm
Range: 150m
Weight: 5.8 kg
Length: 1,400mm
HEAT Penetration: 100mm
NOTE: Fires Special Shrapnel and Flame warheads

Machine Guns

Image
DShKM 12.7mm HMG
caliber: 12,7x109 mm
weight: 34 kg MG body, 157 kg on universal wheeled mount
Length: 1625 mm
Length of barrel: 1070 mm
Feeding: belt 50 rounds
Rate of fire: 600 rounds/min

Image
Degtyarev Pechotnyi (or DP LMG)
caliber: 7.62x54mm R
weight: 8.4 kg w/o magazine; 11.3 kg with loaded magazine
Length: 1266 mm
Feeding: Pan Magazine, 47 Rounds
Rate of fire: 600 rounds/min

Image
Maxim-Sokolov M1910
Caliber: 7.62x54mm R
Length overall: 1,107mm
Barrel length: 723mm
Weight: 23.8 kg
Mount weight: 36 kg
Feed: 250 round belt
Rate of Fire: 520-580 RPM
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

User avatar
MKSheppard
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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-20 03:58am

US Carrier OOB

Pre-War Fleet

CV-1 Langley
15,150 tons
520 x 65.5 x 16.5 feet
Turbo-electric drive, 15.5 kts
468 Crew
35 Aircraft

CV-2 Lake
19,500 tons
600 x 70 x 17 feet
Steam turbines, 25 kts
650 Crew
45 Aircraft

CV-3 United States (OTL Lexington)
38,800 tons
850 x 105.5 x 24.25 feet
Steam Turbines, 34 kts
3,300 crew
90 Aircraft

Yorktown Class
34,800 tons
820 x 93 x 28.5 feet
Steam Turbines, 32.5 kts
2,600 crew
100 aircraft

CV-4 Yorktown
CV-5 Enterprise
CV-6 Essex
CV-7 Hornet

TO BE BUILT UNDER TWO OCEAN NAVY EXPANSION

Gettysburg Class
59,900 tons
900 x 113 x 32.75 feet
Steam Turbines, 33 kts
3,600 crew
137 Aircraft

CVB-8 Gettysburg, commisioned October 11, 1944
CVB-9 Manassas, commisioned September 16, 1943
CVB-10 Ticonderoga, commisioned July 22, 1944
CVB-11 Bunker Hill, commisioned March 25, 1944
CVB-12 Shiloh, commisioned July 18, 1944
CVB-13 Fredricksburg, commisioned December 8, 1943
CVB-14 Vincennes, commisioned April 8, 1944
CVB-15 Valley Forge, commisioned October 24, 1943
CVB-16 Chancellorsville, commisioned September 18, 1943
CVB-17 Vicksburg, commisioned January 24, 1944
CVB-18 Princeton, commisioned March 4, 1944
CVB-19 Lake Champlain, commisioned December 3, 1944
CVB-20 Ottawa, commisioned March 23, 1945
CVB-21 Fredricksburg, commisioned January 13, 1945
CVB-22 San Jacinto, commisioned February 11, 1944
CVB-23 Port Royal, commisioned December 22, 1943

WARTIME CONSTRUCTION

Independence CVLs, based on Newport News CL hulls
(Ordered from existing CL hulls on 10 January 1942)
14,750 tons
600 x 71.5 x 26 feet
Steam Turbines, 31.6 kts
1,460 crew
45 Aircraft

CVL-24 Independence, commisioned August 22, 1943
CVL-25 Liberty, commisioned September 3, 1943
CVL-26 Alfred, commisioned June 8, 1943
CVL-27 Bonhomme Richard, commisioned May 9, 1943
CVL-28 Franklin, commisioned April 11, 1943
CVL-29 Oriskany, commisioned August 26, 1943
CVL-30 Reprisal, commisioned June 8, 1943
CVL-31 Chippewa, commisioned September 2, 1943
CVL-32 Brandywine, commisioned August 6, 1943
CVL-33 Alliance, commisioned April 11, 1943

Passenger Liner Conversions

(Each Ship is it's own distinct class, but they all in general have the following specs)
30,000~ tons
705 x 86 x 30 feet~
Steam Turbines, 26~ kts
1,500~ crew
60~ Aircraft

CVG-34 Wright (HMS Courageous when CVBs begin coming online, named for sunk ship)
CVG-35 Ford (HMS Eagle when CVBs begin coming online, named for sunk ship)
CVG-36 (cancelled)
CVG-37 (cancelled)

Block I Escort CVE orders (54 ships total)

Long Island CVE (converted from finished C3 Freighter)
16,620 tons
465 x 69.5 x 25.75 feet
Diesel engines, 17.5 kts
408 crew
16 Aircraft

CVE-38 Long Island

Block Island CVE (converted from C3 Freighters under construction)
15,120 tons
465 x 69.5 x 25 feet
Steam turbines, 18.5 kts
594 crew
25 Aircraft

CVE-39 Block Island
CVE-40 Card
CVE-41 Bogue
CVE-42 Copahee
CVE-43 Core
CVE-44 Croatan
CVE-45 Nassau
CVE-46 St. George
CVE-47 Barnes
CVE-48 Breton
CVE-49 Prince William
CVE-50 Glacier
CVE-51 (DRM Oswald Boelke)
CVE-52 White Plains
CVE-53 (DRM Yorck)
CVE-54 Hoggatt Bay
CVE-55 Kadashan Bay
CVE-56 Fanshaw Bay
CVE-57 (French Ney)
CVE-58 Kalinin Bay
CVE-59 Casablanca
CVE-60 (Soviet Admiral Ushakov)
CVE-61 Mission Bay
CVE-62 Sargent Bay
CVE-63 Shipley Bay
CVE-64 (Italian Giuseppe Garibaldi)
CVE-65 Thetis Bay
CVE-66 Steamer Bay

Chesapeake Bay CVE (built from S4 Special Merchant Hulls by Kaiser Shipyards)
10,902 tons
Reciprocating engines, 19 kts
490 x 65 x 19.75 feet
764 crew
27 Aircraft

CVE-67 (HMS Chaser)
CVE-68 (Ireland - Shamrock Bay)
CVE-69 Manila Bay
CVE-70 (HMS Nabob)
CVE-71 Natoma Bay
CVE-72 Puget Sound
CVE-73 Saidor
CVE-74 (HMS Battler)
CVE-75 (HMS Trouncer)
CVE-76 Commencement Bay
CVE-77 (French Napoleon)
CVE-78 (Italian Giuseppe Garibaldi)
CVE-79 Suwanee
CVE-80 (HMS Patroller)
CVE-81 St. Andrews
CVE-82 (DRM Max von Immelman)
CVE-83 Sangamon
CVE-84 (HMS Pursuer)
CVE-85 (Spanish Cristobal Colòn)
CVE-86 (HMS Attacker)
CVE-87 Sunset
CVE-88 Niantic
CVE-89 (HMS Ravager)
CVE-90 Jamaica
CVE-91 (HMS Emperor)
CVE-92 (HMS Slinger)

Block II Gettysburg

CVB-93 Hornet, commisioned February 10, 1946
CVB-94 Antietam, commisioned January 6, 1946
CVB-95 Cold Harbor, commisioned December 24, 1945
CVB-96 Appomatox, commisioned January 6, 1946
CVB-97 Coral Sea, commisioned December 6, 1946
CVB-98 Santa Cruz, commisioned July 21, 1946
CVB-99 Wake, commisioned April 3, 1947

Block II CVLs

Macon-class CB Hulls

14 Macon-class CBs (30,000 full load, 9 x 12", 12 x 5", 31 kt speed)

CVL-100 Cowpens
CVL-101 Langley
CVL-102 Monterey
CVL-103 Cabot
CVL-104 Saipan

Block II Escort CVE orders (68 ordered; 59 built)

Baffins CVE (built from S4 Special Merchant Hulls by Kaiser Shipyards; repeat Chesapeake Bays)
10,902 tons
Reciprocating engines, 19 kts
490 x 65 x 19.75 feet
764 crew
27 Aircraft

CVE-105 Baffins
CVE-106 Chatham
CVE-107 (HMS Ameer)
CVE-108 Cordova
CVE-109 Carnegie
CVE-110 (Soviet Admiral Nakhimov)
CVE-111 Edison
CVE-112 Westinghouse
CVE-113 (HMS Khedive)
CVE-114 Edisto
CVE-115 Delgada
CVE-116 Estero
CVE-117 (HMS Trouncer)
CVE-118 Perdido
CVE-119 Prince
CVE-120 Bolinas
CVE-121 Cape Gloucester
CVE-122 St. Joseph
CVE-123 (HMS Thane)
CVE-124 (HMS Puncher)
CVE-125 (Irish - St. Patrick)
CVE-126 Vermillion
CVE-127 (HMS Hunter)
CVE-128 Bastian
CVE-129 Pybus
CVE-130 (DRM Manfred von Richtofen)
CVE-131 Hamlin
CVE-132 Altamaha
CVE-133 (HMS Premier)
CVE-134 Keneenaw

Crazy Horse-class CVEs (Converted from Fleet Oilers/Tankers)
23,875 tons
525 x 75 x 30.5 feet
Steam turbines, 18 kts
830 crew
36 Aircraft

CVE-135 Crazy Horse
CVE-136 Geronimo
CVE-137 (DRM Erich Löwenhardt)
CVE-138 St. Simon
CVE-139 Willapa
CVE-140 Chief Joseph
CVE-141 (French Joffre)
CVE-142 Sitting Bull
CVE-143 Red Cloud
CVE-144 Cochise
CVE-145 (DRM Lothar von Richthofen)

Washakie-class CVEs (Built based on T3 tanker hull from scratch)
21,397 tons
525 x 75 x 30.5 feet
Steam turbines, 19 kts
1,054 crew
33 Aircraft

CVE-146 Washakie
CVE-147 Tecumseh
CVE-148 (HMS Shah)
CVE-149 Gall
CVE-150 (French Petain)
CVE-151 Osceola
CVE-152 Chato
CVE-153 (HMS Searcher)
CVE-154 Crazy Bear
CVE-155 (HMS Queen)
CVE-156 Kicking Bear
CVE-157 (Soviet Admiral Lazarev)
CVE-158 (Spanish Manuel de la Cámara y Libermoore)
CVE-159 Chenago
CVE-160 (HMS Reaper)
CVE-161 Ouray
CVE-162 (HMS Stalker)
CVE-163 Naiche
CVE-164 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-165 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-166 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-167 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-168 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-169 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-170 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-171 unnamed (cancelled)
CVE-172 unnamed (cancelled)

Attack Carriers (8 ordered; 2 built)

America CVAs (Designed to launch aircraft capable of holding 1940s Nukes)
83,249 tons
1030 x 125 x 37 feet
Steam Turbines, 33 kts
4,127 crew
18 x 100,000 pound bombers + 80 x fighters; 98 Total

CVA-173 America, commisioned August 26, 1949
CVA-174 Ranger, commisioned March 6, 1949
CVA-175 Constellation (cancelled)
CVA-176 Kitty Hawk (cancelled)
CVA-177 unnamed (cancelled)
CVA-178 unnamed (cancelled)
CVA-179 unnamed (cancelled)
CVA-180 unnamed (cancelled)

Total Carriers Built by US during DrakaFic's WWII

2 Attack (All America-class)
20 Fleet (All Gettysburg-class)
15 Light (10 Independence-class, 5 Reprisal-class)
4 Passenger Liner Conversions (Sent to British Service mid-war)
113 Escort (76 in US Service) (1 Long Island-class, 28 Block Island-class, 26 Chesapeake Bay-class, 30 Baffins-class, 11 Crazy Horse-class, 18 Washakie-class)

**************
154 Total (117 in US Service)

Total Delivered to Allies:

British: 22 CVEs and 2 CVGs
German: 6 CVEs
Russian: 3 CVEs
Spanish: 2 CVEs
French: 2 CVEs:
Irish: 2 CVEs
**************
39 Total

Postwar fleet:

2 Attack
12 Fleet
6 Light
***************
20 Total
Marina wrote:No USS Quebec City?

Oh, come on, Shep, the taking of the city by one Marine and
twenty indian scouts deserves to be remembered, even if
the defenders surrendered without firing a shot.
Last edited by MKSheppard on 2004-12-20 10:38pm, edited 1 time in total.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-20 04:46am

USN Cruisers

12 Omaha-class (9,500, 8 x 6", 4 x 3", 6 TT, 35kts; date from 1918s)
CL-4 Omaha
CL-5 Milwaukee
CL-6 Cincinnati
CL-7 Raleigh
CL-8 Wilmington
CL-9 Dayton
CL-10 Concord
CL-11 Trenton
CL-12 Marblehead
CL-13 Memphis
CL-14 Tuscaloosa
CL-15 Huntsville

7 Pensacola-class (17,000, 10 x 8", 4 x 5", 32.5kts; date from 1926s)

CA-32 Pensacola
CA-33 Salt Lake City
CA-34 Fresno
CA-35 Northampton
CA-36 Chester
CA-37 Louisville
CA-38 Chicago

5 Houston-class (17,500, 10 x 8", 4 x 5", 32.5kts; re-ordered Pensacolas with modifications due to weight calculation mistakes)

CA-39 Houston
CA-40 Augusta
CA-41 New Orleans
CA-42 Portland
CA-43 Astoria

13 Nashville-Class (13,800 tons full load, 12 x 6", 8 x 3", 8 x 20mm, 750 crew, 32.5 kts, 14,500nm at 15 kts)

CL-44 Nashville
CL-45 Wichita
CL-46 Phoenix
CL-47 Boise
CL-48 Honolulu
CL-49 St. Louis
CL-50 Helena
CL-51 Atlanta
CL-52 Juneau
CL-53 San Diego
CL-54 San Juan
CL-55 Cleveland
CL-56 Columbia

6 Tuscaloosa-class (18,000, 10 x 8", 6 x 5", 32.5kts)

CA-57 Tuscaloosa
CA-58 San Francisco
CA-59 Brooklyn
CA-60 Philadelphia
CA-61 Savannah
CA-62 Vincennes

9 Montpelier-Class (14,000 tons full load, 12 x 6", 6 x 5", 15 x 20mm, 800 crew, 32.5 kts, 14,500nm at 15 kts)

CL-63 Montpelier
CL-64 Denver
CL-65 Columbia
CL-66 Independence
CL-67 Santa Fe
CL-68 Tallahassee
CL-69 Topeka
CL-70 Springfield
CL-71 Boston

4 Baltimore-class CBs (27,000 tons full load, 8 x 12", 8 x 5", 20 x 20mm, 31 kts)

CB-72 Baltimore
CB-73 Pittsburg
CB-74 Richmond
CB-75 Detroit
CB-76 Unnamed (Cancelled)
CB-77 Unnamed (Cancelled)
CB-78 Unnamed (Cancelled)
CB-79 Unnamed (Cancelled)

6 Pasadena-class CLAAs (15,860 tons full load, 18 x 5", 12 x 20mm, 32.5 kts, Laid down in 1936)

CLAA-80 Pasadena
CLAA-81 Duluth
CLAA-82 Miami
CLAA-83 Oklahoma City
CLAA-84 Little Rock
CLAA-85 Galveston

TO BE BUILT UNDER TWO OCEAN NAVY EXPANSION

30 Newport News-class CLs (16,300 tons full load, 12 x 6", 20 x 20mm, 32.5 kts)

CL-86 Newport News
CL-87 Cancun
CL-88 Huntington
CL-89 Biloxi
CL-90 Providence
CL-91 Manchester
CL-92 Crown Point
CL-93 Fargo
CL-94 Tampico
CL-95 Reno
CL-96 Oakland
CL-97 Flint
CL-98 Tucson
CL-99 Buffalo
CL-100 Newark
CL-101 Amsterdam
CL-102 Progreso
CL-105 Wilkes-Barre
CL-106 Vallejo
CL-107 Chattanooga
CL-108 Salina Cruz
CL-109 Fresno
CL-110 Oregon City
CL-111 Albany
CL-112 Rochester
CL-113 Rockville
CL-114 Cambridge
CL-115 Bridgeport
CL-116 La Paz

14 Macon-class CBs (30,000 full load, 9 x 12", 12 x 5", 31 kt speed)

CB-117 Macon
CB-118 Toledo
CB-119 Tulsa
CB-120 Fall River
CB-121 Rosarito
CB-122 Des Moines
CB-123 Los Angeles
CB-124 San Quintin
CB-125 Scranton
CB-126 Salem
CB-127 Dallas
CB-128 Worcester
CB-129 Roanoke
CB-130 Veracruz

12 Calgary-class CLAAs (17,230 tons full load, 20 x 5", 40 x 40mm)

CLAA-131 Calgary
CLAA-132 Gary
CLAA-133 Fairbanks
CLAA-134 Tepic
CLAA-135 Hamilton
CLAA-136 Acapulco
CLAA-137 Saskatoon
CLAA-138 Winnipeg
CLAA-139 San Fernando
CLAA-140 Vancouver
CLAA-141 San Jose
CLAA-142 Thunder Bay

The wartime ordered ships are kinda speculative and not included
since the USN, RN, and IJN OOBs kinda need to be done together
along with the early parts of the war in pacific according to
Skimmer, because the USN will be ordering ships based on it's
wartime experiences in mid-1942.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-20 07:06am

USN Small Combatants and Auxilaries (Still a WiP)

Pre-War Destroyers
10 Porter DDs (From February 1935 to February 1936)
23 Mahan DDs (From July 1935 to October 1936)
7 Somers DDs (From January 1936 to January 1938)
8 Bagley DDs (From June 1936 to October 1936)
5 Gridley DDs (From June 1936 to October 1936)
14 Benham DDs (From June 1937 to November 1938)
15 Sims DDs (From May 1938 to May 1939)

82 DDs Pre-War

War-Built Destroyers
37 Benson DDs (From July 1939 to February 1942)
82 Gleaves DDs (starting from June 1939 to August 1942)
232 Fletcher DDs (starting from June 1941 to February 1944)
88 Allen M. Sumner DDs (starting from January 1943 to October 1944)
188 Gearing DDs (starting from May 1944 through end of war)

627 DDs built during the War

War-Built Destroyer-Escorts
142 Evarts DEs From January 1942 to August 1944
211 Buckley DEs from April 1942 to March 1944
114 Edsall DEs from May 1942 to February 1943
251/339 Rudderow DEs from January 1942 through end of war
114/154 Cannon DEs from May 1942 through end of war
293/396 John C. Butler DEs from December 1942 through end of war

1,125/1,356 DEs built during the War

Pre-War Landing Ship, Tanks
4 Ships of LST 1 Class From April 1940 to December 1940 (LST 1-4)

War-Built Landing Ship, Tanks
682 ships of LST 5 Class (@ LST 1 Class) From June 1942 through end of war (LST 5-686)
72 ships of LST 687 Class (@ LST 491 Class) from February 1943 through end of war (LST 687-759)
850 ships of LST 760 Class (@ LST 542 Class) from November 1943 through end of war (LST 760-1610)

1,604 LSTs built during the war

War-Built Landing Craft (Do not appear in significant numbers until 1942)
Landing Craft, Vehicle, Personnel: 35,096 LCVP
Landing Craft, Personnel (Large): 3,375 LCP(L)
Landing Craft, Infantry (Large): 1,709 LCI(L)
Landing Craft, Mechanized: 17,075 LCM
Landing Craft, Rubber (Large): 15,188 LCR(L)
Landing Craft, Rubber (Small): 12,225 LCR(S)
Landing Craft, Support (Small): 848 LCS(S)
Landing Craft, Tank: 2,154 LCT
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Mark 1):1,838 LVT(1)
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Mark 2): 4,443 LVT(2)
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Mark 3): 4,446 LVT(3)
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Mark 4): 12,525 LVT(4)
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Armored) (Mark 1): 765 LVT(A)1
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Armored) (Mark 2): 675 LVT(A)2
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Armored) (Mark 4): 2,835 LVT(A)4
Landing Vehicle, Tracked (Armored) (Mark 5): 404 LVT(A)6

Pre-War Destroyer Tenders
4 Dobbin class ADs (from 1924, sold beginning in 1947) (AD 3-6)
1 Blackhawk AD (From 1918, sold in 1942) (AD 9)
1 Bridgeport[/i] AD (From 1918, sold in 1942) (AD 10)
3 Altair ADs (From 1921, sold beginning in 1946) (AD 11-13)
3 Dixie ADs (from 1939) (AD 14-16)

13 ADs in service before the war

War-Built Destroyer Tenders
4 Dixie ADs (Built from war's beginning to 1943) (AD 17-20)
2 Cascade ADs (Available from 1942) (AD 21-22)
4 Klondike ADs (Available from 1944) (AD 23-26)
15 Arcadia ADs (Available from 1942 thru end of War) (AD 27-42)

25 ADs built during the war

War-Built Attack Cargo Ships
20 Arcturus AKAs from 1943 and on (converted completed ships)
42 Andromeda AKAs from 1943 to 1945 (purpose built ships)
45 Artemis AKAs from 1944 to 1946 (purpose built ships)
45 Tolland AKAs from 1944 to 1946 (purpose built ships)

152 AKAs built during the war
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2004-12-30 10:19am

Contemporay Newsmagazine Cover from 1946

Image

Contemporay Newsmagazine story from 1945

Jun. 11, 1945

At his headquarters on Nightingale Island, Major General Curtis Emerson LeMay added up
the results of three months' massive B-29 attacks on Cape Town. Tough-minded, realistic
Curt LeMay claimed nothing of which he could not be sure. The things of which he could
be sure:

*50.3 sq.mi. of Cape Town (40% of the built-up area) had been burned or bombed to ashes.

*4,500,000 people who had lived in the area were now homeless.

*50 Superforts had been lost—one per sq.mi. of devastation,

"We have destroyed all the target areas we have set out to destroy."

No doubt Cape Town would be bombed again, because it still contained inviting, if less
concentrated, targets. And the same fate was in store for other Drakian cities. As LeMay
spoke, his staff and the Snakes were both computing the results of the B-29s' first smash
at Windhoek—in which 450 planes dropped 3,200 tons of mixed inciendaries and bombs.
The 21st Bomber Command said 6.9 sq.mi. of the great provincal capital was burned out;
the Snakes said 60,000 homes were destroyed. Next on the B-29s' list was industrial
Port Elizabeth, which caught another 3,000-ton load of U.S. bombs.

Yearling's Growth.

The yearling Twentieth Air Force was feeling its oats. It had another new wing in the
St. Helena Chain, operating from a great new field on Tristan. The weight of its blows
had been stepped up 100% in two months, and would soon be further increased.

Enemy opposition to the Superfort attacks, while still stout, has begun to show signs of
weakening. Flak remains heavy, but not uniformly so; fighter opposition on most recent
assaults has been light. But in the drive to knock out Drakian industry, the B-29s will now
face a new enemy: weather. Between September and February, South Africa's rainiest
season, the air will be warm, moist and thick with clouds. Inevitably, more bombing will
have to be done by instruments and will be correspondingly less accurate, but there
will be no lightening of the bomb loads.
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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Post by MKSheppard » 2005-01-12 07:46pm

USAAF OOB Through DrakaFic

Napalm is invented Mid 1942

NOTE: Numbers are sketchy, subject to revision

BOMBERS

Early Pre War Bombers:

Image
B-18A Bolo
2 x 1000 hp R-1820-53 (1000hp/takeoff, 850hp/9600ft)
215 MPH at 10,000, 167mph cruise,
1150 mile range with 2400 pounds of bombs

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 170 produced, the last 70 aircraft were remanufactured
to B-18B standards during the late 30s, and the other 100 aircraft have been sold off
to foreign powers.

Image
B-18B Bolo
2 x 1600 hp R-2600-1 (1600hp/takeoff, 1275hp/12,000ft)
280 mph at 13,000, 215 mph cruise,
1260 mile range with 2640 pounds of bombs

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 321 produced; 1x Hvy Bomb Grp in CONUS,
1 x Hvy Bomb Grp in Central America, 2 x Hvy Bomb Grp in Phillipines

NOTE: this is the XB-22, an improved Bolo with 1,600 hp engines

Image
B-15C Fortress
4 x 1600 hp R-2600-1 (1600hp/takeoff, 1275hp/12,000ft)
260mph at 6500 feet, cruise at 197 mph
3,900 miles with 2,800 pounds of bombs

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 87, equipping 1 Heavy Bomb Group in CONUS.

NOTE: These bombers are the child of the 1930s, where money was very tight; as a result of the Boeing
Model 299's crash, no further money was put forth by the Army towards it; and the money was reallocated
to the XB-15 program, also by Boeing, resulting in an aircraft with much less inspiring performance than
the B-17.

Immediate Pre War Bombers:

Image
B-24A Liberator (enters service in September 1939)
4 x R-1830-33 (1200 hp/takeoff, 1000hp/14,500ft)
292 mph at 15,000 ft; cruise 228 MPH, 30,500 ft ceiling. 2,200 miles with 4,000 pounds
4 x .50 cal, 2 x 30 cal

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 48 produced; used for training pilots in CONUS

Image
B-25 Mitchell (25 built, delivered from February 1940)
2 x Wright R-2600-9 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
3 x .30 MGs, 1 x .50 MG, and 3,600 lbs of bombs
322 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
2000 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

Image
B-26 Marauder (201 built, delivered from February 1940)
2 x P&W R-2800-5 Double Wasp, 1850 hp each
2 x .30 MGs, 2 x .50 MGs, 4,800 lbs of bombs
315 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
265 mph cruise speed
1,000 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

Image
B-25A Mitchell (41 built, delivered from June 1940)
2 x Wright R-2600-9 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
3 x .30 MGs, 1 x .50 MG, and 3,600 lbs of bombs
315 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
1,350 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: added 3/8th inch armor plate for the pilot, co-pilot's, and bombardier's
seats, along with the gunner's compartment. Self sealing fuel tanks were also added.

Image
B-24B Liberator (Enters service in July 1940)
4 x R-1830-41 (1200 hp/takeoff, 1200hp/20,000ft)
Self Sealing Tanks introduced.
300mph top speed.
8 x .50 cal

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 82 produced; equipping 1 Heavy Bomb Group in CONUS.

Image
B-25B Mitchell (124 built, delivered from September 1940)
2 x Wright R-2600-9 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
4 x .50 MGs, 1 x .30 MG, and 5,000 lbs of bombs
300 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
2,000 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: A dorsal power-operated turret with twin .50 MGs was added.

Image
B-26A Marauder (40 built, delivered from October 1940)
2 x P&W R-2800-5 Double Wasp, 1850 hp each
4 x .50 MGs, 4,800 lbs of bombs
313 mph max speed
243 mph cruise speed
1,000 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

Image
B-25C Mitchell (2,113 built, delivered from December 1940)
2 x Wright R-2600-9 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
6 x .50 MGs, 5,200 lbs of bombs
284 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
233 mph @ 15,000 ft cruise speed
1,500 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: First mass production B-25. Was widely supplied through lend-lease.

B-25D Mitchell (2,863 Built, enters service February 1941)

NOTE: B-25C Mitchells built by North American's Kansas City plant.

Image
B-26B Marauder (2,448 built, built from May 1941 to February 1943)
2 x P&W R-2800-43 Double Wasp, 1920 hp each
11 x .50 MGs, 4,800 lbs of bombs
282 mph max speed @ 15,000
1,100 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

Image
B-24C Liberator (enters service in June 1941)
4 x R-1830-43 (1,200 hp/takeoff, 1200hp/23,400ft)
303 mph at 25,000 ft, cruise at 200 mph.
Service ceiling 32,000 ft
2,300 mile range with 5,000 pounds of bombs
8 x .50 cal

NUMBERS AS OF 1941: 18 produced, with 156 ordered.

Image
B-26C Marauder (1,573 built, built from August 1941 to April 1943)

NOTE: Was a B-26B built in Omaha, Nebraska at a new plant for it.

Wartime Bombers:

B-24E Liberator (756 built, enters service March 1942)

NOTE: North American built B-24Cs

B-24D Liberator (2,020 Built, enters service June 1942)

NOTE: Ford Built B-24Cs

B-24F Liberator

NOTE: Experimental version built to test VDT engine (Turbocompounding).

Image
B-25G Mitchell (600 built, delivered from July 1942)
2 x Wright R-2600-13 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
1 x 75mm cannon, 2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 Mgs in dorsal turret, 3,000 lbs of bombs
280 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
233 mph @ 15,000 ft cruise speed
1,500 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: The -G model was basically a B-25C with the 'greenhouse' nose replaced
by a shorter solid nose housing a 75mm M4 cannon and two fixed .50-cal. machine guns.
The cannon was manually reloaded after each shot; twenty one 75mm rounds were carried
onboard.

Image
B-24G Liberator (4,112 built, enters service August 1942)

NOTE: Added nose turret. Due to large structural changes needed (56) was late
in arriving to the fronts.

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B-24H Liberator (15,186 built, enters service November 1942)
4 x R-1830-65 (1,200 hp/takeoff, 1200hp/31,800ft)
300 mph at 30,000 feet; 277mph at 20,000 ft
1,700 mile range with 5,000 pound bombload
10 x .50 cal MGs

NOTE: Has heavier armor than previous models, but is unpopular with it's crews due to
it's excessive weight, as it is now 8,000 lbs heavier than earlier models, with no increase in power,
leading to very little reserve power for takeoffs, causing accidents to rise, and their heavier weights
led to higher breakups if the wing was holed.

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B-26F Marauder (390 built, built from February 1943)

NOTE: The B-26F differed from the B-26B/C primarily in having the angle of incidence
of the wing increased by 3.5 degrees. This was yet another attempt to decrease the takeoff
run and to lower the landing speed. This increased angle of incidence resulted in a distinctly
canted-up engine nacelle, which gave more ground clearance for the propellers and provided
a more level cruising attitude. Previous Marauder models had cruised with a slight nose-high
attitude. However, the increased angle of incidence resulted in a reduction of maximum speed
to 277 mph, and the B-26F did not handle quite as well as previous versions.

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B-25H Mitchell (1,500 built, delivered from May 1943)
2 x Wright R-2600-13 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
1 x 75mm cannon, 8 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 Mgs in dorsal turret 2 x.50 cal in rear turret, 3,200 lbs of bombs
275 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
230 mph @ 15,000 ft cruise speed
1,350 miles with 3,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: The B-25H was an improved version of the B-25G. The fixed nose
armament was increased to four nose-mounted .50-cal. machine guns and four more
.50-cal. machine guns in fuselage mounted pods. The 75mm cannon was changed
from the -G model's M4 to the lighter T13E1 75mm cannon.

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B-29 Superfortress (3,253 built, enters service March 1943)
4 x R-3350-23 (2200 hp/takeoff, 2300hp/25,000ft)
342 mph at 30,000 feet; cruise 220 mph at 25,000
Service ceiling 33,600 feet.
3,250 miles at 25,000 feet with 5,000 pounds
1,500 miles at medium with 12,000 pounds
12 x .50, 1 x 20mm

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B-29A Superfortress (963 built, enters service May 1943)
4 x R-3350-57 (2200 hp/takeoff, 2300hp/25,000ft)
357 mph at 30,000 feet; cruise 220 mph at 25,000
Service ceiling 33,600 feet.
4,000 miles at 25,000 feet with 5,000 pound bombload
12 x .50 cal MG
1,600 miles at medium with 12,000 pounds

NOTE: The B-29A was the version of the Superfortress built by Boeing at the Navy-owned Renton plant.

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B-26G Marauder (1,161 built, built from August 1943 to April 1944)

NOTE: The final production version of the Marauder was the B-26G. It was
externally similar to the B-26F, but had universal Army-Navy equipment rather
than specifically Air Corps-type equipment.

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B-29B Superfortress (451 built, enters service September 1943)
4 x R-3350-41 (2200 hp/takeoff, 2300hp/25,000ft)
364 mph at 25,000 ft, cruise at 210-225 mph.
4,200 miles at 10,000 feet with 18,000 pound bombload
1 20mm in tail

NOTE: This is a lightened version built by Bell, in addition, many B-29s and B-29As were
modified to B-29B standard in the field.

B-29C Superfortress (1,357 built, enters service November 1943)

NOTE: Boeing-built B-29B.

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B-29D Superfortress (4,649 built, enters service April 1944)
4 x R-4360-35 (3,500 hp/takeoff, 3,500hp/25,000ft)
393 mph at 25,000 feet, 402 mph at 30,000 feet, cruise at 235 mph.
Service ceiling 37,500 feet
5,000 miles with 10,000 pounds of bombs.
2 x 20mm in tail.

B-29E Superfortress

NOTE: Cancelled VDT (Turbocompound) version.

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B-25J Mitchell (5,615 built, delivered from July 1944)
2 x Wright R-2600-13 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
3 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MGs in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MGs in Waist, 2 x.50 MGs in rear turret, 4,000 lbs of bombs
275 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
230 mph @ 15,000 ft cruise speed
1,275 miles with 3,200 lbs of bombs

NOTES: Majority of J model production went to allied states, after a few thousand had been sent to
the USAAF to replace B-25C and D models lost through attrition and combat losses.

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B-25J Mitchell (Strafer) (1,040 built, delivered from July 1944)
2 x Wright R-2600-13 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
18 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 Mgs in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MGs in Waist, 2 x.50 cal in rear turret, 4,000 lbs of bombs, 8 x 5" HVARs
275 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
230 mph @ 15,000 ft cruise speed
1,275 miles with 3,200 lbs of bombs

NOTES: Dedicated Strafer version of the B-25J, was designated as B-25J-11, -17, -22, -27, -32, or -37
depending on which Block J was modified with the enclosed nose.

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B-42 Mixmaster (6,649 built, enters service June 1945)
2 x Allison V-1710-125 (1,325 hp/takeoff, 1,800hp WEP)
410 mph at 23,440 ft
312 mph cruising speed
Service ceiling 29,400 feet
4 x 2000 lb bombs (8,000 lbs) maximum bombload
3,750 lbs to 1850 mile range
4 x 20mm in remotely controlled turrets

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B-29F Superfortress (1,850 built, enters service August 1945)
4 x R-4360-35 (3,500 hp/takeoff, 3,500hp/25,000ft), 2 x J47 turbojets (5,200 lbs thrust)
430 mph at 25,000 feet, 415 mph at 30,000 feet, cruise at 233 mph.
Service ceiling 38,800 feet
5,000 miles with 10,000 pounds of bombs
2 x 20mm in tail

NOTE: Many B-29Ds were converted to B-29Fs in the field, in addition to the ones
produced in the factory.

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B-36A Peacemaker (19 built, Enters Service mid-1945)
6 x R-4360-25 (3250 hp/takeoff, 3000hp/40,000ft)
375 mph at 41,600 feet. Cruising speed 248 mph.
Service ceiling 49,100 feet
7760 miles with 10,000 pound bombload

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B-36B Peacemaker (78 built, Enters Service late-1945)
6 x R-4360-41
411 mph at 44,500 feet, cruising speed 232 mph
Service Ceiling 52,500 feet
12 x 20mm
8,000 miles with 10,000 pound bombload

NOTE: Most B-36Bs were converted to B-36C standard by Convair in
1946, by adding jet pods and removing the gun turrets.

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B-36C Peacemaker (268 built, Enters Service mid-1946)
6 x R-4360-41, 4 x J-47 Turbojets (5,200 lbs @)
469 mph at 42,120 feet, crusing speed, 250 mph.
Service Ceiling 55,200 feet
12 x 20mm
8,000 miles with 10,000 pound bombload

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B-47A Stratojet (148 built, enters service late 1947)
6 x J47-GE-11 turbojets (5,200 lbs thrust)
600 MPH @ 8800 ft
2650 mile range with 10,000 lbs (16 x 1000 lbs or 1 x 22,000 lb bomb carried at max overload)
2 x 20mm in tail turret

NOTE: Was insituted to replace the B-29 as SAC's medium bomber against
heavily defended air space, developmental delays in the aeroelastic wing delayed the
program until the very end of the war, at which point the remaining order for 2,500 was
cancelled.

FIGHTERS

Early Pre War Fighters:

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P-26 Peashooter (111 built, entered service early 1934)
1 x .50 MG, 1 x .30 MG, or 2 x .30 MGs, 5 x 30 lb bombs or 2 x 100 lb bombs
R-1340-27 Wasp, 500 hp
245 mph top speed
645 mile range

Intermediate Pre War Fighters:

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P-39A Airacobra (21 built, enters service 1939)
1 x 37mm, 2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .30 MGs
Allison V-1710-35, 1,150 hp
392 mph @ 18000 ft
650 mile range

NOTE: Unlike in our timeline, the USAAF did not delete the turbosupercharger
from the P-39, so performance of the P-39 is 15 MPH and 5,000 ft higher than in our
timeline.

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P-40 Warhawk (210 built, enters service June 1939)
Allison V-1710-33, 1,040 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .30 MGs
357 mph @ 15,000 ft
580 mile range

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P-39B Airacobra (48 built, enters service February 1940)
1 x 37mm, 6 x .50 MGs, 300 or 600 lb bomb
Allison V-1710-35, 1,150 hp
383 mph @ 17000 ft
600 mile range

NOTE: Introduced self sealing fuel tanks, bulletproof windshield, and a
72-gallon drop tank hardpoint was provided.

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P-40B Warhawk (142 built, enters service May 1940)
Allison V-1710-33, 1,040 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 4 x .30 MGs
352 mph @ 15,000 ft
730 mile range

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P-40C Warhawk (201 built, enters service July 1940)
Allison V-1710-33, 1,040 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 4 x .30 MGs
345 mph @ 15,000 ft
730 mile range

NOTES: Fuel tanks had improved self sealing, and provisions were made for a
52-gallon drop tank.

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P-40D Warhawk (38 built, enters service August 1940)
Allison V-1710-39, 1,150 hp
4 x .50 MGs
362 mph @ 15,000 ft
650 mile range

NOTES: 175 lbs of armor was added, Shackles were added under the belly to
accommodate a 51-gallon auxiliary fuel tank or a 500-pound bomb. Wing rack attachment
points were provided for six 20-pound bombs.

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P-38D Lightning (38 built, enters service in August 1940)

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P-40E Warhawk (3,210 built, enters service September 1940)
Allison V-1710-39, 1,150 hp
6 x .50 MGs
362 mph @ 15,000 ft
650 mile range

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P-38E Lightning (105 built, enters service October 1940)
2 x Allison V-1710-27, 1,150 hp each
4 x .50 MGs and 1 x 20mm cannon
395 mph @ 25,000 ft
400 mile range

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P-47B Thunderbolt (150 built, enters service March 1941)
R-2800-21 Double Wasp, 2000 hp
429 mph @ 27,000 ft top speed

NOTE: The majority of these were sold to the Irish Air Force for $1.00
shortly after the US Declaration of War.

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P-39C, D, E ,F, G, H, J, K Airacobras (1,393 built, enters service May 1941 - August 1942)

NOTE: Most of these were various marks produced in small number lots, from 20 aircraft
to 200, with the only differences being various radio fits, propellor fits, and improved engines.
No real notable improvements over the P-39Bs.

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P-38F Lightning (527 built, enters service May 1941)
4 x .50 MGs and 1 x 20mm cannon, drop tanks or 2 x 1000 lb bombs
2 x Allison V-1710-49/53, 1325 hp each
395 mph @ 25,000 ft

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P-38G Lightning (1,582 built, enters service June 1941)
4 x .50 MGs and 1 x 20mm cannon, drop tanks or two 325, 500, 1000 lb bombs
2 x Allison V-1710-51/55 (F10), 1325 hp each
400 mph @ 25,000 ft
850 mile range, 1750 miles on max external fuel

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P-47C Thunderbolt (548 built, enters service September 1941)
8 x .50 caliber MGs, 500 lb bomb or drop tank
R-2800-21 Double Wasp, 2000 hp
433 mph @ 30,000 ft
353 mph @ 5,000 ft
640 mile range, 1250 miles with drop tank

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P-47D Thunderbolt (Blocks 1-11) (1,135 built, enters service December 1941)
8 x .50 caliber MGs, 500 lb bomb or drop tank
R-2800-21 Double Wasp, 2000 hp
433 mph @ 30,000 ft
353 mph @ 5,000 ft
640 mile range, 1250 miles with drop tank

NOTE: Early blocks of the P-47D differed little from the P-47Cs which had preceded
it on the production lines. The P-47D had some changes in the turbosupercharger exhaust
system which incorporated an adjustable duct and redesigned vents for the engine accessory
section. Additional cowl flaps were fitted to prove engine cooling airflow. More extensive armor
protection was provided for the pilot.

Wartime Fighters:

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P-47D Thunderbolt (Blocks 12-22) (3,453 built, enters service March 1942)
8 x .50 Caliber MGs, 2 x 1000 lb bombs or 3 x 500 lb bombs or drop tanks
R-2800-63 Double Wasp, 2000 hp (water injection boost to 2300 hp)
429 mph at 30,000 ft
350 mph @ SL
950 mile range, 1800 miles on max external fuel

NOTE: This Block Run introduced the unitary wing to the P-47, which allowed a vast variety of
different loads to be carried under the wings, instead of being limited to a single belly hardpoint.

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P-40G Warhawk (6,264 built, enters service March 1942)
Allison V-1710-81, 1,200 hp
4 x .50 MGs
378 mph @ 10,500 ft
700 mile range

NOTES: A new lightweight structure was used for this last Warhawk. Later production
blocks restored the two deleted .50 MGs, and underwing racks were fitted for bombs or drop
tanks, increasing external stores capacity to 1500 pounds, giving a range of 350 miles with
a 500 lb bomb under the fuselage. Most of the production went to foreign countries.

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P-47D Thunderbolt (Blocks 23-25) (3,400 built, enters service July 1942)
8 x .50 Caliber MGs, 2 x 1000 lb bombs or 3 x 500 lb bombs or drop tanks
R-2800-59 Double Wasp, WEP of 2535 hp
429 mph at 30,000 ft
350 mph @ SL
950 mile range, 1800 miles on max external fuel

NOTE: This block run added the bubble canopy, dramatically increasing the pilot's field of vision.

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P-38J Lightning (5,284 built, enters service August 1942)
4 x .50 MGs and 1 x 20mm cannon, drop tanks or two 325, 500, 1000 lb bombs
453 mph at 26,500 feet
2 x Packard V-1650-3, 1,620 hp each (Allisons in @, only had 1425 hp) (390 hp gain)
1000 mile range, 2480 miles with max external fuel

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P-39L Airacobra (2,159 built, enters service October 1942)
1 x 37mm, 2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .30 MGs, 500 lb bomb
Allison V-1710-93, 1,325 hp
410 mph @ 25,000 ft
600 mile range

NOTE:Had an entirely new laminar-flow wing, dramatically increasing performance,
as well as a more powerful engine.

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P-38L Lightning (4,550 built, enters service September 1943)
4 x 20mm cannon, drop tanks or two 325, 500, 1000 lb bombs (later blocks)

NOTE: Identical to P-38J except for armament.

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P-47D Thunderbolt (Blocks 25-40) (May 1943) (4,120 built)
6 x 20mm Cannon, 2 x 1000 lb or 3 x 500 lb bombs or 10 x 5" rockets or drop tanks
R-2800-59 Double Wasp, WEP of 2535 hp
429 mph at 30,000 ft
350 mph @ SL
950 mile range, 1800 miles on max external fuel

NOTE: This Block Run was the definitive P-47D. The eight fifty caliber machine guns were
removed and replaced with six 20mm cannons, which had a much greater effect on Drakian
aircraft than the fifties.

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P-47G Thunderbolt (5,120 built, enters service September 1943)
6 x 20mm Cannon, 2 x 1000 lb or 3 x 500 lb bombs or 10 x 5" rockets
R-2800-77, 2800 hp
460 mph at 30,000 ft
800 mile range, 2350 miles on maximum external fuel

NOTE: This was the ultimate evolution of the P-47, borne aloft on an entirely new
"wet" wing of larger span and area than the old wing, and for the first time in the Thunderbolt
series, fuel was put into the wing, for a total of 186 more gallons of fuel, which with full maximum
external fuel in drop tanks, allowed 1266 gallons to be carried. Other modifications were larger
ailerons and squared off wingtips which improved roll rate and manuverability.

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P-39M Airacobra (4,624 built, enters service December 1943)
1 x 37mm, 2 x .50 MGs, 500 lb bomb
Allison V-1710-117, 1,325 hp (WEP 1,500 hp; 1,800 hp with water injection)
410 mph @ 25,000 ft
600 mile range

NOTE:Had an uprated engine with water injection. Total weight of armor rose to 201 lbs,
also a new bubble canopy was added, increasing visibility.

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P-72 Superbolt (6,129 built, enters service February 1944)
4 x 20mm Cannon, 2 x 1000 lb or 3 x 500 lb bombs or 10 x 5" rockets
R-4360-13 Wasp Major, 3450 hp
490 mph at 25,000 ft
1200 mile range, 2520 miles with max external fuel

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P-80A Shooting Star (2,223 built, enters service February 1944)
4 x 20mm cannon, 10 x 5" rockets or 2 x 500 lb bombs
J33-GE-11 turbojet, 3850 lb thrust (early blocks)
J33-A-17 turbojet, 4000 lb thrust (middle blocks)
J33-A-17 turbojet, 5200 lb thrust (late blocks)
558 mph @ sea level, 492 mph @ 40,000 ft
780 mile range, 1440 miles with max external fuel

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P-84 Thunderjet (2,280 built, enters service in December 1945)
4 x 20mm cannon, 2 x 1000 lb bombs, or 2 x 11.75" Tiny Tim Rockets
J35-A-15C turbojet, 4000 lb thrust (early blocks)
J35-A-17D turbojet, 5000 lb thrust (later blocks)
587 mph @ 4000 ft

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P-86 Sabre (1,200 built, enters service in June 1946)
4 x 20mm, 2 x 1000 lb bombs and 16 x 5" HVAR
J47-GE-1 turbojet, 4850 lbs thrust
679 mph @ sea level, 601 mph @ 35,000 ft

Reconnaissance Aircraft:

F-4A Lightning (30 built, November 1941)

NOTES: Converted from P-38Fs

F-5A Lightning (200 built)

NOTES: Converted from P-38Gs

F-5B Lightning (220 built)

NOTES: Converted from P-38Js

RP-80 Shooting Stars (195 built)

NOTES: Converted from P-80s.

RB-29F Superfortress (200 built)

NOTES: Converted from B-29Fs or built as new, did considerable
pre-attack recon for OPERATION BIG STICK.

RB-36 Peacemaker (40 built)

NOTES: Built from B-36C blueprints as dedicated recon aircraft.

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RB-45 Tornado (165 built, enters service late 1945)
2 x J47-GE-13 (5,820 lbs thrust each), 2 x J47-GE-15 (6,000 lbs each)
570 mph @ 4000 ft max speed
506 mph cruise
2500 mile range with tip tanks
40,250 ft service ceiling

ATTACK CRAFT

Early Pre-War Attack Aircraft:

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A-12 Shrike (56 built, entered service November 1932)
Wright R-1820-21, 670 hp
4 x .30 MGs, 1 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 10 x 30 lb bombs internally, or 4 x 100 lb bombs externally.
177 mph @ sea level max speed
151 mph @ sea level max cruise
450 mile range

NOTES: The last 14 A-12s were retired shortly after the US declaration of war, most already had been
sold off to foreign customers.

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A-17 (118 built, entered service February 1935)
R-1535-11 Twin Wasp Junior, 750 hp
4 x .30 MGs, 1 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 20 x 17-30 lb bombs internally, or 4 x 100 lb bombs externally.
207 mph @ sea level max speed
170 mph @ sea level max cruise
650 mile range with 654 lbs of bombs, max range 1240 miles

NOTES: Were replaced by A-17As with retractable undercarriages shortly after introduction, and were
sold to foreign customers or sent to mechanics' schools.

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A-17A (135 built, entered service April 1936)
R-1535-13 Twin Wasp Junior, 825 hp
4 x .30 MGs, 1 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 20 x 17-30 lb bombs internally, or 4 x 100 lb bombs externally.
220 mph @ sea level max speed
170 mph @ sea level max cruise
730 mile range with 654 lbs of bombs, max range 1195 miles

NOTES: After only three years of service with the Army, the A-17As were declared surplus in 1939,
and were sold to foreign customers or spent their days as squadron hacks or advanced trainers before ending
up in mechanics' schools. The last A-17A was stricken from the US inventory on October 31, 1943.

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A-18 Shrike (14 built, entered service July 1936)
2 x Wright R-1820-47 Cyclone, 930 hp each
4 x .30 MGs, 1 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 20 x 30 lb bombs internally
239 mph @ 2,500 ft max speed
211 mph cruise speed
1,443 miles with 654 lbs of bombs, max range 1700 miles

NOTES: In 1939, the Y1A-18s were transferred to the Third Bombardment Group at Lawson Field
for operational training as plain A-18s. They saw no combat, and the last A-18 was withdrawn from service
in 1942.

Intermediate Pre-War Attack Aircraft:

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A-20A Havoc (153 built, entered service December 1939)
2 x Wright R-2600-11 Double Cyclone, 1600 hp each
4 x .30 MGs, 2 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 1 x .30 MG firing in ventral tunnel
Single 1,100 lb bomb or similar weight of smaller bombs.
347 mph @ 12,400 ft max speed
295 mph cruise speed
525 miles with 2,400 lbs of bombs
675 miles with 1,200 lbs of bombs
2000 mile max range
max range 1700 miles

NOTES: The A-20A was the A-20 high altitude light bomber design with the turbosuperchargers
removed for low altitude ground attack duties.

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A-20B Havoc (1,020 built, entered service December 1940, delivered until January 1942)
2 x Wright R-2600-11 Double Cyclone, 1600 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 1 x .50 MG firing rearwards, 1 x .30 MG firing in ventral tunnel
1,500 lbs normal bombload, maximum 2,400 lbs
350 mph @ 12,000 ft max speed
278 mph cruise speed
825 miles with 1,000 lbs of bombs
2000 mile max range
max range 1700 miles

NOTES: The A-20B lacked the self sealing fuel tanks of the earlier A-20A, and was not as well armored,
in the field, many A-20Bs had their plexiglass noses fared over and the bombardier's position replaced with
four to six .50 MGs. Most of the production run (some 700 aircraft) was sent to the Soviet Union under lend-lease.

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A-20C Havoc (965 built, delivered beginning in August 1941)
2 x Wright R-2600-23 Double Cyclone, 1600 hp each
8 x .30 MGs, 2 x .30 MG firing rearwards, 1 x .30 MG firing in ventral tunnel
1,500 lbs normal bombload, maximum 2,400 lbs
342 mph @ 13,000 ft max speed
280 mph cruise speed
745 miles with 1,000 lbs of bombs
2000 mile max range
max range 1700 miles

NOTES: Based on combat reports from the Soviet operators of the earlier A-20B, self-sealing fuel tanks and
more armor were added. Also added was the capability to carry a standard 2,000 lb naval torpedo underneath
the bomb bay externally, due to requests from the VVS.

Wartime Attack Aircraft:

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A-20F Havoc (4,275 built, delivered beginning in February 1942 and ending in 1943)
2 x Wright R-2600-23 Double Cyclone, 1600 hp each
6 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 1 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
2,000 lbs maximum internal bombload
339 mph @ 12,400 ft max speed
230-272 mph cruise speed
1025 miles with 2,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: Early A-20Fs had four 20mms in the nose, but they were prone to jamming, and were replaced with
six .50 cal MGs after 300 aircraft were built. Also, in later production blocks, four underwing hardpoints were provided
for an additional 2,000 lbs of ordnance, in addition to the bombload carried internally. Large numbers of the A-20F
were provided to other countries under Lend-Lease.

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A-20G Havoc (618 built, delivered beginning in late 1943, and ending in mid 1944)
2 x Wright R-2600-29 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
6 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 1 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
2,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
333 mph @ 15,600 ft max speed
269 mph cruise speed
1025 miles with 2,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: The A-20G was identical to the A-20F, with the exception of being powered by the 1700 hp R-2600-29.
This change in powerplant was made necessary by the discontinued production of the 1600 hp R-2600-23. The additional
takeoff power offered by the -29 engine was especially welcome since the takeoff weight had increased from 21,500
pounds for the A-20C to 24,170 pounds for the A-20G.

A-20J Havoc (675 built, delivered beginning in late 1943, and ending in mid 1944)
2 x Wright R-2600-29 Double Cyclone, 1700 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 1 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
2,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
333 mph @ 15,600 ft max speed
269 mph cruise speed
1025 miles with 2,000 lbs of bombs

NOTES: The A-20J was designed as a lead ship version of the A-20G. A single A-20J would fly at the front
of a formation of A-20G's. When the A-20J bombardier dropped his bombs using the traditional method of direct
sighting, all other aircraft in the formation would time their bomb drops based on the release of the lead aircraft. The
A-20J and A-20G production lines ran in parallel with at a ratio of about 1 -J model for every 6 -G models built.

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A-24B Invader (3,033 built, delivered September 1943)
2 x P&W R-2800-27, 2000 hp each
14 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
4,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
355 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
284 mph cruise speed
1400 mile normal range
3200 mile maximum range

NOTES: The dorsal turret could be aimed forward for ground attack missions, allowing
16 machineguns to be fired forward; and both turrets were remotely operated.

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A-24C Invader (1,020 built, delivered September 1943)
2 x P&W R-2800-27, 2000 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
4,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
355 mph @ 15,000 ft max speed
284 mph cruise speed
1400 mile normal range
3200 mile maximum range

NOTES: The A-24C's glass nose was fitted with a bombardiers compartment and was designed
for use as a lead ship for medium attitude bombing missions. On a typical bombing mission, a single
A-24C would lead a formation of A-24B's. When the bombardier in the lead aircraft dropped his bombs,
it also signaled the -B's in formation to drop their bombs.

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A-41 Destroyer (1,200 built, late 1944)
4 x .50 MGs, 4 x 37mm cannon, and 6,400 lbs of mixed weapons
R-4360-1 Wasp Major, 3000 hp
363 mph top speed, 300 mph cruise
800 mile combat range

NOTES: The A-41 was procured as a cheap low-cost attack aircraft to complement the increasingly
complex and expensive attack aircraft the Army Air Forces were acquiring.

A-24D Invader (4,020 built, delivered June 1945)
2 x P&W R-2800-83, 2100 hp each
14 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
4,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
403 mph max speed
310 mph cruise speed
1500 mile normal range
4500 mile maximum range (with bomb bay aux fuel tank)

NOTES: Wing tip fuel tanks and a raised cockpit for better pilot visibility were added to the last
major A-24 Invader variants, and the engines were improved R-2800s, with 100 more hp each.

A-24E Invader (1,300 built, delivered June 1945)
2 x P&W R-2800-83, 2100 hp each
2 x .50 MGs, 2 x .50 MG in dorsal turret, 2 x .50 MG firing in ventral tunnel
4,000 lbs maximum internal bombload, plus 2,000 lbs on four wing hardpoints
403 mph max speed
310 mph cruise speed
1500 mile normal range
4500 mile maximum range (with bomb bay aux fuel tank)

NOTES: Glass nose variant of the A-24D, with the same improvements, such as wing tip fuel tanks and
a raised cockpit for better pilot visibility, and the engines were improved R-2800s, with 100 more hp each than
the older engines.

CARGO AIRCRAFT

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C-46A Commando (3,012 built, delivered beginning in July 1941)
2 x P&W R-2800-51 Double Wasp, 2000 hp each
15,000 lbs of cargo
50 troops or 38 paratroopers, or 33 litters
270 mph max speed
173 mph cruise speed
3,150 mile normal range

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C-46D Commando (5,030 built, delivered beginning in June 1944)
2 x P&W R-2800-51 Double Wasp, 2000 hp each
15,000 lbs of cargo
50 troops or 38 paratroopers, or 33 litters
270 mph max speed
173 mph cruise speed
3,150 mile normal range

NOTES: The C-46D was primarily designed as a troop carrier and had cargo/paratroop doors
on both sides of the fuselage.

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C-47 Dakota/Skytrain (4,348 built, delivered beginning in September 1940)
2 x P&W R-1830, 1200 hp each
6,000 lbs of cargo
28 paratroopers or 14 litters
232 mph max speed
175 mph cruise speed
1,513 mile normal range

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C-82 Packet (3,360 built, delivered beginning in late 1944)
2 x P&W R-2800-85, 2,100 hp each
11,500 lbs of cargo
41 paratroopers or 34 litters
250 mph max speed
162 mph cruise speed
2,140 mile normal range

NOTES: The C-82 has clamshell front doors and a rear ramp allowing loading of large, bulky
outsized items of cargo.

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C-119 Flying Boxcar (1,024 built, delivered beginning in late 1946)
2 x P&W R-4360-20, 3,500 hp each
30,000 lbs of cargo
64 paratroopers or 35 litters
281 mph max speed
1,770 mile range

NOTES: The C-119 has clamshell front doors and a rear ramp allowing loading of large, bulky
outsized items of cargo.

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C-74 Globemaster (320 built, delivered beginning in late 1944)
4 x P&W R-4360-27 Wasp Majors, 3,000 hp each
74,000 lbs of cargo
125 troop or 115 litters
312 mph max speed
260 mph cruise speed
7,200 mile range

NOTES: Basically a scaled-up DC-4 / C-54.

TOTALS

8,245 P-39s built
12,086 P-38s built
10,065 P-40s built
17,926 P-47s built
6,129 P-72s built
2,223 P-80s built
2,280 P-84s built
1,200 P-86s built
---------------------------------
60,154 fighters built for the USAAF/Lend Lease in WWII

22,360 B-24s built
13,921 B-25s built
5,813 B-26s built
12,523 B-29s built
365 B-36s built
6,649 B-42s built
148 B-47s built
---------------------------------
61,779 bombers built for the USAAF/Lend Lease in WWII

7,706 A-20s built
9,373 A-24s built
1,218 A-41s built
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18,297 attack aircraft built for the USAAF/Lend Lease in WWII

8,042 C-46s built
4,348 C-47s built
320 C-74s built
3,360 C-82s built
1,024 C-119s built
-------------------------------
17,094 cargo aircraft built for the USAAF/Lend Lease in WWII
"If scientists and inventors who develop disease cures and useful technologies don't get lifetime royalties, I'd like to know what fucking rationale you have for some guy getting lifetime royalties for writing an episode of Full House." - Mike Wong

"The present air situation in the Pacific is entirely the result of fighting a fifth rate air power." - U.S. Navy Memo - 24 July 1944

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