Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

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A-Wing_Slash
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Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by A-Wing_Slash » 2019-05-09 04:00am

TLDR: Amazon owns a company, Ring, that not only wants to put cameras on your doorbell, but also have they upload videos to both the police and a publicly-accessible crime news service.

https://www.axios.com/amazons-neighborh ... 040c8.html
Amazon's neighborhood watch app raises discrimination, privacy fears
Illustration of an Amazon box house with a spotlight on it
Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios
Advocates and experts are worried that an Amazon-owned mobile app, used by owners of its Ring security cameras to upload videos for neighbors to see, could entrench racial discrimination and violate people's privacy.

Why it matters: The app, called Neighbors, is striking deals to partner with police departments across the country.

Driving the news: Last week, journalists on Twitter noticed Ring was hiring an editor — prompting concerns that Amazon was stoking community fears to sell security systems. (Amazon bought the company last year.)

How it works: People with and without Ring cameras can download the Neighbors app. It features a feed where users can post videos and photos from their cameras, file reports of activity they think is suspicious and read crime reports from the app's “News Team.”

The application partners with law enforcement, allowing them to post alerts to solicit possible video evidence useful to their investigations through a platform described by The Intercept earlier this year. (The company says that when "using Neighbors Portal, law enforcement see the same interface that all users see.")
An agreement obtained by the open-records site MuckRock between the Richmond, Va. police department and Ring said it was up to the agency to maintain “appropriate access controls for RPD personnel to use the Ring Neighborhood Police portal.”
Part of the agreement was that for every "qualifying download" of the app that came from the Richmond program, the city would get a $10 credit towards donated cameras.
Details: The Neighbors app highlights multiple concerns about what happens when you build digital platforms for neighborhoods, particularly those that aim to spotlight crime, said multiple advocates and experts.

Neighborhood message boards are already famously rife with racism, and Motherboard reported earlier this year it had found frequent racist comments on Ring's app as well. “I think having the videos oftentimes makes things even worse than they would be in just a text-based neighborhood message board format,” said Harlan Yu, executive director of the research group Upturn.
The ubiquitous nature of Ring cameras runs the risk of capturing behavior unrelated to the crimes they are supposed to deter. "This is sort of supercharging the surveillance of people’s private lives and potentially constitutionally protected activity,” said Shankar Narayan, director of the Technology and Liberty Project at the Washington state branch of the American Civil Liberties Union.
What they’re saying: The burdens of increased video surveillance and fears stoked by the apps will fall on people of color, who are already more likely to face police discrimination.

“The bottom line is that this app is going to end up simply stoking people’s fears, especially people’s racist fears, and it’s also going to bring law enforcement to act on people's racial biases,” said Yu.
“Amazon needs to recognize that law enforcement itself in this country has a long and documented history of racial discrimination," Yu added.
Ring has also filed patents related to facial recognition, technology that can notoriously reflect racial bias.
Ring's response: "We realize that there are many intricacies involved in fighting crime and facilitating community discussions and are always looking at ways to further develop and enhance our services," the company said in a statement.

The company said it encourages "neighbors to report racial profiling using our in-app flagging tool" and that its users "have full control of who views their Ring footage."
It also denied using facial recognition.
Digitizing the neighborhood watch has raised discrimination concerns before.

In 2015, the Business Improvement District in Washington, D.C.'s wealthy Georgetown neighborhood found that almost 70 percent of the "suspicious" people discussed on a GroupMe chat between shops and police were black.
Nextdoor, the popular message board app for neighborhoods, has struggled with racism on its platform as well.
The Neighbors app is already being linked to arrests, according to reports from local news outlets around the country.

In February, police in Shawnee, Kansas weren’t able to find a man who had been allegedly trying to cash stolen checks.
They used Ring’s app, asking residents to "Check your video. Check out your windows," Shawnee Police Department Sgt. Craig Herrmann told a local television station.
“We were able to have people basically continuing to watch, to look for him after we left,” he said.
The bottom line: The number of data-hungry devices — from wearables to connected appliances to security cameras — keeps growing, raising increasingly urgent questions about how they shape society and perpetuate biases.
https://www.niemanlab.org/2019/04/a-doo ... -end-well/
A doorbell company owned by Amazon wants to start producing “crime news” and it’ll definitely end well
Because what good is a panopticon if you can’t generate some clicks?
By JOSHUA BENTON @jbenton April 29, 2019, 2:35 p.m.
When news organizations think about competition from tech companies, it’s usually in terms of the audience’s attention and advertisers’ dollars. But if Amazon has its way, a new sort of competition may be coming from a mixture of surveillance, fear, and doorbells.

Amazon is currently looking to hire someone with the title “Managing Editor, News.” But it’s not for the entire Amazon empire — it’s for the small slice of it that makes security-focused doorbells, Ring. (Amazon bought Ring last year for more than $1 billion.)

Here’s the job description, emphases mine:
The Managing Editor, News will work on an exciting new opportunity within Ring to manage a team of news editors who deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors. This position is best suited for a candidate with experience and passion for journalism, crime reporting, and people management. Having a knack for engaging storytelling that packs a punch and a strong nose for useful content are core skills that are essential to the success of this role. The candidate should be eager to join a dynamic, new media news team that is rapidly evolving and growing week by week.
The job requires at least five years’ experience “in breaking news, crime reporting, and/or editorial operations” and three years in management. Preferred traits include “deep and nuanced knowledge of American crime trends,” “strong news judgment that allows for quick decisions in a breaking news environment,” and experience using “social media channels to gather breaking news.”

That’s right: A doorbell company wants to report crime news.


Tom Gara

@tomgara
Editor in chief of the internet doorbell company is a very 2019 media gig https://www.amazon.jobs/en/jobs/836421/ ... 131b016067

Managing Editor, News
The Managing Editor, News will work on an exciting new opportunity within Ring to manage a team of news editors who deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors. This position is best suited...

I hope a really thoughtful person gets that job, but I’m going to go out on a limb and say that this is a really bad idea.

Americans think there’s way more crime than there really is.
Here’s a chart, via Visual Capitalist, of how crime has declined enormously over the past 25 years — compared to public perceptions of crime, in the bottom-right corner. Crime goes down and down and down; people’s perception of how much crime there is doesn’t.

A majority of Americans have said crime is increasing in each of the past 16 years — despite crime in each major category being significantly lower today than it used to be.

A 2016 Pew survey found that only 15 percent of Americans believed (correctly) that crime was lower in 2016 than it had been in 2008 — versus 57 percent who thought it had gotten worse. (Unsurprisingly, those inaccurate beliefs are not evenly distributed politically, with conservatives, Republicans, and Trump supporters each more likely to see dangers the statistics don’t support. A couple hours of watching Fox News makes the approach pretty clear.)

Gallup data shows that a majority of Americans have only thought crime was getting better in their community once in the past 47 years — October 2001, when presumably they had other concerns to focus on.

Local media — especially local TV news — is largely to blame for those mistaken beliefs.
These mistaken beliefs are driven largely by the editorial decisions of local media — especially local TV news, which are just as bloody today as they were when murder rates were twice as high. There’s a term for it: mean world syndrome, the phenomenon where media consumption makes people see the world as more violent and dangerous than it really is. And TV has historically been the worst offender; a body of past research has shown that people who rely on local TV most for their local news are more fearful of crime; that local TV’s crime news disproportionately shows black criminals and increases racial fears; that the more local TV news you watch, the more fearful you get.

Those fears and mistaken beliefs are important: Consuming more local TV crime news is associated with supporting more punitive anti-crime measures, and reducing exposure to crime news can even increase presidential approval ratings.

Local news has even convinced people that day-to-day crime stories — the vast majority of which have no impact on the viewer and which should occasion exactly zero changes in their behavior — important to their day-to-day lives.

A report from Pew last month asked people about various topics in local news and asked both if they thought they were important or interesting and, if so, why. Did they consume news about a topic because it was important to their daily lives, because it was important but not to their daily lives, or just because they found it interesting?

Those surveyed overwhelmingly said crime news was important. But more striking is that so many of them said it was important to their daily lives. To put that in context, the top 3 “important to their daily lives” topics were weather, crime, and traffic. Weather and traffic really are important to your daily life! Figuring out what to wear or which route to take to work are very useful services local news can provide. But local TV news has convinced Americans that stories of violence are news-you-can-use at the same sort of level. (Only 9 percent said they followed local crime news because it was “interesting.”)

Media respond to incentives — but so do companies.
In recent years, a number of newspapers have decreased the emphasis they put on crime stories in their coverage. There are a number of reasons. Day-to-day crime is something TV is always going to have an advantage on. There are fewer reporters to go around than there used to be. And as newspapers have retooled for digital subscriptions over pageviews, crime news is less important to what they’re offering readers.

(When I worked at The Dallas Morning News in the 2000s, a consultant once came through telling editors that crime news was what the audience really wanted on the web, and the paper changed its presentation accordingly to chase pageviews. For a while, the homepage of dallasnews.com was almost as bloody as the 10 o’clock news. But looking at the homepage today — with the paper having pivoted to seeking digital subscriptions — only 3 of the top 17 stories are about violent crime.)

In an API study asking new newspaper subscribers what topics they were most interested in, “crime and public safety” only ranked 7th out of 19; only 18 percent included crime news in the three topics they followed most. Meanwhile, local TV news, fighting for ratings in an environment of declining attention, have mostly stuck to their guns, so to speak, keeping crime news prominent.

In other words, news organizations — for better and for worse — respond to audience incentives. If they think their audiences want more crime news, they’ll probably produce more of it — and vice versa.

But news organizations have multiple and sometimes conflicting incentives that might impact how they present the local police blotter. A company that sells security-optimized doorbells has only one incentive: emphasizing that the world is a scary place and you need to buy our products to protect you.

STRANGER DANGER!!!
Ring already has an app called Neighbors that, judging by its marketing, encourages people living in bucolic suburbs with wrought iron gates to feel like they’re in the last un-zombified neighborhood in The Walking Dead. (I assume this app is where this new managing editor’s work product will be found.)

The Neighbors App is the new neighborhood watch that brings your community together to help create safer neighborhoods. With real-time crime and safety alerts from your neighbors, law enforcement and the Ring team, the Neighbors App proactively keeps you in the know. Criminals target neighborhoods, not individual homes. But with real-time crime and safety alerts from your neighbors, you’ll stay one step ahead of crime.

Basically, it’s an app that makes you want to see your neighborhood the same way that this screenshot does: SUSPICIOUS STRANGER CRIME CRIME STRANGER CRIME SUSPICIOUS SUSPICIOUS CRIME CRIME CRIME SUSPICIOUS STRANGER CRIME.

So think about this managing editor job. The places where Ring wants to be “covering local crime” are…everywhere, down to the house and neighborhood level. So one managing editor, plus however many other people are on this team, are supposed to be creating a thoughtful, non-exploitative editorial product that is sending journalistically sound “breaking news crime alerts,” in real time, all across the country. Will they really be delivering news or just regular pulses of fear in push-notification form? If that’s the job, it is figuratively impossible to do responsibly.


stacy-marie ishmael

@s_m_i
“The Managing Editor, News will work on an exciting new opportunity within Ring to manage a team of news editors who deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors.” I have no jokes, only MAJOR CONCERNS about surveillance + the worst of NextDoor https://www.amazon.jobs/en/jobs/836421/ ... 131b016067


Managing Editor, News
The Managing Editor, News will work on an exciting new opportunity within Ring to manage a team of news editors who deliver breaking crime news alerts to our neighbors. This position is best suited...

I downloaded Neighbors — you can do so without owning a Ring, a.k.a. lead generation — and plugged in my address in boring Arlington, Mass., a city of 45,000 that recorded 0 murders and only 7 robberies last year. It decided I needed to know that someone in the uniform of a local lawn-care service had recently knocked on someone’s door instead of using the doorbell and, when no one answered, left. Also, there was a building fire two towns away, a couple of days ago.

Also, two young people, one male, one female, wearing identical t-shirts and lanyards with name badges, carrying clipboards — in other words, pretty clearly people trying to get signatures for some cause or another — rang a doorbell and then walked away when no one answered. “Anyone know who they are?” the Ring owner asks, perhaps concerned about ISIS infiltration of the Boston suburbs. “Call the police,” one helpful commenter replies. (The young people in question appear to be white, but it doesn’t take a critical race theorist to suspect that suggestion might turn into action for people of color who dare to approach a front door.)

Now, there are plenty of other apps that aim to turn the magical stew of unverified reports, stand-your-ground ideology, and paranoia into $$$. Citizen — an app that used to have the more straightforward name of Vigilante — is perhaps the most well known.

But what bugs me about this is that it wants to bring in the credibility of journalism as a layer on top of the state of constant fear it promotes. A company that relies on people feeling unsafe to sell its products will now be able to take whatever trust professional journalism has left and put it to work toward that end. It’s like relying on the people who make antivirus software to tell you about the latest cybersecurity issues: Even when the reporting is sound, it’s still prone to exaggerating the scale of the threat and still aimed at making you so afraid that you give them money.

(A cynic — okay, me — might note that this managing editor job is listed under “Marketing & PR,” not editorial.)

Is it possible that real journalists can make the product better and less paranoid? Sure, it’s possible. But the reality is that “breaking crime news alerts” are not something the vast majority of people need — especially if “two Greenpeace volunteers stood on my porch for 30 seconds” is the bar we’re talking about. It’s not actionable intelligence — it’s puffing a little more air into an atmosphere of fear.

News organizations’ coverage of crime is flawed in a million different ways. But at least they’re operating in a context where crime is one story out of dozens and where not all incentives point in the same direction. Even once you get past the absurdity of it all — a doorbell company writing crime news — it’s a bad direction to be going in. They say they’re selling safety, but they’re really selling fear. And it’s also a reminder that, if local news organizations go away, you might not like what fills the gaps they leave behind.

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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by GrosseAdmiralFox » 2019-05-31 02:58am

You should also note that there has been an uptick of 'porch piracy' as of late, which is problematic because that represents lost profits as Amazon has to send them another of the item stolen while filing a report on it. Add onto the fact that we're living in a world where it is becoming increasingly likely that something like, oh, the Dollar Flu from The Division series is unleashed because of some idiot with too much ideology than sense...

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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by Broomstick » 2019-05-31 07:46am

....The Dollar Flu.....? Never heard of it.

But yeah, porch piracy is a thing and that is increasing even if other forms of crime are going down. Personally, I've applauded the use of things like "drop boxes" and pick-up lockers by Amazon, UPS, and others as a solution. It's also why I got a PO Box, so large packages could be sent to me at a secure location instead of being left on my doorstep.

The Ring system, though, seems like an overly-technological solution to the problem. I mean, sure, fine it's an option but it shouldn't be the only one.
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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by madd0ct0r » 2019-05-31 12:55pm

The techbro ecosystem likes overly techinical solutions - theyd buy it over a boring steel box.

The techbro ecosystem provides venture capital funding from senior tech bros. So ideas by techbros, for techbros get prioritised by tech bros.
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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by K. A. Pital » 2019-06-01 07:40am

Bullshit system.

Fix society to reduce crime rates, motherfuckers.

Don’t offer a cyberpunk band-aid. Fucking techbros.
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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by Solauren » 2019-06-01 08:17am

Techbros don't have the ability to fix society's problems.

Most of us are social incompetents, after all :)

But, seriously, mix opinion on this.

I'm against leaving parcels on porches or door ways on principal, for a number of reasons.
'Porch Piracy is one of them'.
Another is weather. I've come home to packages out and it was storming out.

That, and the fact is hasn't been brought in/picked up is practically advertising 'there is no one home'.

However, most people don't seem to care.

This tech would sit better with me if you had the option of uploading it to a public server, or just streaming it onto your phone (like interior security cameras can). But not as the 'default.'
\

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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by TheFeniX » 2019-06-01 02:16pm

Basically, it’s an app that makes you want to see your neighborhood the same way that this screenshot does: SUSPICIOUS STRANGER CRIME CRIME STRANGER CRIME SUSPICIOUS SUSPICIOUS CRIME CRIME CRIME SUSPICIOUS STRANGER CRIME.
I love Journalism like this. Thrilling. So, I bought a Ring cam because A. UPS uses some "plainclothes" dudes out here and my wife orders shit which requires people to be home to have it delivered.
B. My Internet company sucks shit and their schedules are dumb. Doorbell rings/gets detects motion, I answer it and say "I can be there in 3 minutes" because I work .9 miles from my home.
C. Some kids were playing "Ding Dong Ditch" so I just left the live feed up on my computer. When they came back, I just yelled "HEY!" and they scattered. Funny.
D. I switched to the Ring Home Security system after IRIS by Lowe's went tits up. I did it more for automation, but it's pretty nice. Especially since my Son is now old enough to figure out the bottom door lock and the "beep beep" let's me know he's trying to make a run for it.

The Neighborhood app is hilarious because we live in the "dirt poor, largely minority neighborhood" and we had pretty much zero crime. Down the road (in the new Rich People community), the Ring Doorbells help capture two people breaking into cars. And, though have no real details, helped out with some time of crime issues with some assaults. I have no idea what became of the whole thing.

I recall one article where the upper-class "journalist" was like "I had to get rid of my Ring because I became obsessed with it and was always on edge."
He kept playing himself off like a hugely understanding liberal guy, but kept pointing out how he near immediately started buying into the "racist hype" and how EVERYONE ELSE (the tech especially) WAS TO BLAME, but not Good Understanding "I have 2 black friends" Mr. Journo Guy.

Yea, tech like this empowers cowards and morons to live in fear of everything and have realizations that they are really just as shitty as everyone else. Which they would do anyways, but you just wouldn't hear about it. I like the Neighbors app because it provides hard evidence to me about how petty, stupid, and cowardly an ENTIRE NEIGHBORHOOD can be. Before this, you could only get a "feel" for it.

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Re: Amazon expands the panopticon to your front door

Post by Broomstick » 2019-06-01 02:37pm

K. A. Pital wrote:
2019-06-01 07:40am
Bullshit system.

Fix society to reduce crime rates, motherfuckers.
I've been advocating (and voting) that for years. Haven't made much headway. Think I'll stick to dropboxes and PO boxes while I'm waiting for the rest of society to come to its senses.
Don’t offer a cyberpunk band-aid. Fucking techbros.
For once we agree on all points.
A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. Leonard Nimoy.

Now I did a job. I got nothing but trouble since I did it, not to mention more than a few unkind words as regard to my character so let me make this abundantly clear. I do the job. And then I get paid.- Malcolm Reynolds, Captain of Serenity, which sums up my feelings regarding the lawsuit discussed here.

If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. - John F. Kennedy

Sam Vimes Theory of Economic Injustice

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