Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

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Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by FaxModem1 » 2019-01-25 09:14pm

Yahoo
Bernie Sanders set to announce 2020 presidential run
Hunter Walker White House Correspondent,Yahoo News•January 25, 2019
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WASHINGTON—Three years after fighting a surprisingly competitive Democratic primary race against Hillary Clinton, Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, is making another run for the White House.

Two sources with direct knowledge of his plans told Yahoo News that Sanders, an independent and self-described “democratic socialist,” plans to announce his presidential bid imminently. While Sanders has been considering a bid for months, one of the sources said he was emboldened by early polls of the race that have consistently showed him as one of the top candidates in a crowded Democratic primary field. In particular, the source said Sanders was heartened to see numbers indicating he is one of the leading candidates among African American and Latino voters, two groups he was perceived as struggling with in 2016.


Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, in the Capitol on Jan. 24, 2019. (Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images)
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The source also alluded to a spate of recent polls that show Sanders as the most popular politician in the country. They attributed Sanders’ strength in the polls to the base and name recognition he built with the prior presidential bid.

“What the senator has this time that he didn’t have last time is he is the most popular elected official in the country right now,” the source said. “That’s light years away from 2016, when very few people knew who he was.”

A third source said Sanders’ bid will begin with an exploratory committee. Sanders’ campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment for this story.

In addition to these two sources, a former Sanders staffer who had not been briefed on the imminent announcement plans nevertheless said many recent signs suggest he is set to pull the trigger on a presidential campaign. Specifically, the former staffer said Sanders has been building out the infrastructure he would need for a White House bid.

“He’s already talking to staff and there are people he’s hiring. They’re nailing down contracts with vendors. … All the movement is there for him to run,” the ex-staffer said.

Although Sanders was ultimately defeated by Clinton last time around, his upstart campaign reshaped the Democratic Party. Sanders ran on a progressive platform that included a focus on eliminating income inequality, on campaign finance reform and an ambitious “Medicare for All” health care proposal. Those principles have become centerpieces for the progressive wing of the Democratic Party, and several Sanders-backed candidates won elections last year.

But Sanders’ impact on the Democratic Party went beyond his political vision. The primary battle between Sanders and Clinton was contentious, with Sanders allies contending that Clinton’s campaign was working in conjunction with the Democratic Party establishment to prevent a Sanders victory. These battles cemented divisions in this party that linger on as the 2020 election approaches.

After President Trump’s victory over Clinton in 2016, Sanders and his allies pressed for reforms to the Democratic National Committee that would make the party’s primary process more open and inclusive of what Sanders termed “the working people and young people of our country.”

Amid Sanders’ push for reform, the DNC assembled a “unity commission” to recommend changes that included members chosen by both Sanders and Clinton. Ultimately, the DNC made rules changes that included one of the main items on Sanders’ agenda, curbing the role of unelected superdelegates in choosing the party’s presidential nominee. At the same time, the DNC also adopted a rules change that would make it more difficult for independents like Sanders to seek the party’s presidential nomination.

In spite of this, Sanders’ allies consider that this new rule does not hurt his chances, because the Vermont Democratic Party passed a resolution last year recognizing him as a full member. A source who discussed Sanders’ 2020 plans with Yahoo News confirmed that he will be running as a Democrat.

Although he will be entering an extremely crowded Democratic field, Sanders is starting from a formidable position. Early polls of the race have consistently showed him to be one of the top candidates, probably due to the base of support he established in 2016. Sanders allies also believe his prior run could give him a head start organizing in key early primary states. Last October, Pete D’Alessandro, Sanders’s Iowa state coordinator for the 2016 race, told Yahoo News he was confident the senator would be able to build on the grassroots support and infrastructure he established in 2016 if he made another run.

“This was a movement. It still is a movement,” D’Alessandro said.
Further proof we need a Democratic Primary megathread.

I'm a fan of Sanders. Though I don't want him to be a spoiler, he does have a sizable portion of the party behind him, and the Democratic Party will need to realize that and talk to him about what position they are willing to have him in. Giving him his own cabinet post or something if they don't want him to run.
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Re: Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by GrosseAdmiralFox » 2019-01-26 06:55pm

Is Bernie stupid or senile? Because this only gives the GOP propaganda ammunition. He should stay in the sidelines and mentor someone to take his spot instead of being in the front lines.

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Re: Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by FireNexus » 2019-01-26 10:28pm

I don’t think they need to talk to him about anything. Because every last democratic hopeful either is compiling or has already compiled oppo on him. And frankly, he’s never run a national campaign where his opposition wasn’t largely holding its fire to avoid alienating his supporters. When it can’t be reliably traced back to anyone and it’s known what a political cold sore he can be if he’s let build momentum, nobody’s holding fire. I think the surfacing of the problems with his 2016 campaign probably originated with some Democratic strategist, and I don’t think it’s going to be the spiciest shit.

Add in that he’s lost his monopoly on small dollar donations, as well as his monopoly on the “progressive” mantle, and that a sizable portion of his 2016 support was from being a lightning rod for “Not Hillary”. I don’t think Sanders is going to be an important factor this time around. He’s certainly not going to be able to generate the kind of money he’ll need to stay in the race without having a chance of winning like he did in 2016. I bet he suspends before or just after the first contests.
I had a Bill Maher quote here. But fuck him for his white privelegy "joke".

All the rest? Too long.

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Re: Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-01-27 02:06am

Leaving aside the inevitable Bernie bashing, I do think that its probably a mistake for him to run now. He's going to split the progressive vote, and make it more likely that a centrist gets the nomination. And FireNexus is right that he won't have the monopoly on progressives support he did last time. Its a very different and much more open field. If he had declared before Warren, I might have backed him (probably would have, in fact), but I want a united progressive movement, and right now I feel that Bernie would better serve the cause by throwing his considerable strength (he does have a strong base and a high-profile voice) behind Warren.

That said, I also don't think Bernie is going to be particularly detrimental to the Democrats. He'll provide a platform for socialist views in the race, but it won't be as polarized and divisive a race as last time because of the nature of the field. If the progressives solidify around a single candidate early, it might all work out for the best.

If Warren drops out first, I'll probably consider backing him, depending on how his campaign functions over the next year. It goes without saying that I will back whoever captures the nomination. But for the time being, Warren is still my choice for progressive standard bearer this time around.

Edit: I also think it would be a mistake for Centrist Democrats to immediately go full-bore attack mode on Sanders (even though I anticipate that many will do exactly that). Because right now, its not as polarized a primary, and it isn't "Bernie vs. the Establishment". But going into all-out attack mode on Sanders will dredge all that shit right back up again, give him more attention while ensuring that whatever the outcome, there will be more ill-feeling and divisions. I think just letting Bernie do his thing, alongside a dozen other big name candidates, is the best thing the party can do right now.
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Re: Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by FireNexus » 2019-01-27 03:26am

The Romulan Republic wrote:
2019-01-27 02:06am
I also think it would be a mistake for Centrist Democrats to immediately go full-bore attack mode on Sanders (even though I anticipate that many will do exactly that). Because right now, its not as polarized a primary, and it isn't "Bernie vs. the Establishment". But going into all-out attack mode on Sanders will dredge all that shit right back up again, give him more attention while ensuring that whatever the outcome, there will be more ill-feeling and divisions. I think just letting Bernie do his thing, alongside a dozen other big name candidates, is the best thing the party can do right now.
The order of the day if you’re in a primary with him is making sure he has to follow the same rules as anyone else. Meaning he has to deal with dedicated and tenacious opposition research from the jump. Don’t directly attack him if you don’t have to, but make sure that you use resources to put together a lot of puzzle pieces on whatever negative and unflattering bullshit is in his past or present. Then get the right people interested in finishing the puzzle. If there’s not anything juicy enough, manufacture whispers that end up being self-fulfilling prophecy unless his people (and he’s lost a lot of his Varsity people to others) can flip the narrative. You make sure that there is a constant drip of bad news about him, about his associates, about his past, etc. for as long as there is bad news to turn reporters onto. I might be wrong, but I think that’s going to be an eternity in candidate years. And I think we’ve seen the first drip.

I don’t expect the main users of this strategy to be the centrists, either. Because as you’ve said they don’t really stand to gain from weakening Bernie, at least not early, except where there is a collective action problem. Warren has a lot of talent behind her run, and she’s the candidate who most directly benefits (as you’ve implied) from neutralizing Bernie. Bernie in splits the progressive wing. Weakening Bernie strengthens Warren. And only Warren, this far. If I’m right and the 2016 gender horror story came from a Democratic strategist, my money would be on them working on her behalf.

This hypothesis about origin and strategy makes a testable prediction, too. You would expect negative news stories about Sanders to come out often, and you’d expect that they come out when they most damage him. After he (predictably in advance) makes good headlines, in the run up to debates, or when Warren needs a change of subject. Expect them to stop if he’s polling badly, except when they help Warren change the subject. Expect them also to make for a natural contrast between Warren and Sanders that makes Warren look comparatively better to small dollar donors and others in Bernie’s white young progressive base, who they’ll be directly competing for.

For all you like Bernie you have to admit that he was treated like a candidate with a dedicated base but an intrinsic expiration date through all of 2015. He was treated like not a real threat, and that was a tactical mistake by Clinton no matter what you think of him. Because if he’d been neutralized before he picked up steam and O’Malley had been the Not Hillary, the 2016 Democratic Primary would have been done by Super Tuesday.

(I tried hard here to keep my animus for Sanders as a candidate and a man out of this. I’m just pointing out why using the full political playbook to neutralize Sanders early is actually a good strategy considering how he got to critical mass in 2016.)
I had a Bill Maher quote here. But fuck him for his white privelegy "joke".

All the rest? Too long.

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Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 03:12pm

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/19/us/p ... -2020.html
Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent and 2016 Democratic primary runner-up whose populist policy agenda has helped push the party to the left, embarked on Tuesday on a second run for president, in a bid that would will test whether he could retain the anti-establishment appeal he enjoyed with many liberal voters three years ago.

A self-styled democratic socialist whose calls for “Medicare for all,” a $15 minimum wage and tuition-free public colleges have become pillars of the party’s left wing, Mr. Sanders is among the best-known politicians to join an already crowded Democratic field and one of the most outspoken against President Trump, whom he has repeatedly called a “pathological liar” and a “racist.”

“Three years ago, during our 2016 campaign, when we brought forth our progressive agenda we were told that our ideas were ‘radical’ and ‘extreme,’” Mr. Sanders said on Tuesday in an early-morning email to supporters, citing those health, economic and education policies as well as combating climate change and raising taxes on wealthy Americans.

“Well, three years have come and gone. And, as result of millions of Americans standing up and fighting back, all of these policies and more are now supported by a majority of Americans,” he said.

[Here is where Mr. Sanders stands on the issues.]

Mr. Sanders did not immediately announce where he would campaign first, nor did he disclose any staffing decisions for his political operation. His senior advisers have been spending the weeks leading up to the announcement attempting to recruit a more diverse array of aides than were on his earlier campaign.

A sensation in 2016, Mr. Sanders is facing a far different electoral landscape this time around. Unlike his last bid for the White House, when he was the only liberal challenger to an establishment-backed front-runner, he will be contending with a crowded and diverse field of candidates, including popular Democrats like Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts who have adopted his populist mantle.

Victories in the 2018 midterm election by women, minorities and first-time candidates also suggest that many Democrats may prefer fresh energy, something that skeptics believe Mr. Sanders could struggle to deliver. A 77-year-old whose left-wing message has remained largely unchanged in his decades-long career, Mr. Sanders will also need to improve his support from black voters and quell the unease about his campaign’s treatment of women that has been disclosed in recent news accounts, and that has prompted two public apologies.

Yet almost immediately after making his announcement, Mr. Sanders drew criticism for his response to Vermont Public Radio when asked if he thought he best represented the current Democratic Party.



“We have got to look at candidates, you know, not by the color of their skin, not by their sexual orientation or their gender and not by their age,” Mr. Sanders said. “I think we have got to try to move us toward a nondiscriminatory society which looks at people based on their abilities, based on what they stand for.”
The Trump re-election campaign issued a statement about Mr. Sanders that reflected the president’s strategy of labeling his Democratic opponents as “socialists.” The press secretary for the Trump campaign, Kayleigh McEnany, said Mr. Sanders had already won the Democratic debate because “every candidate is embracing his brand of socialism.” The statement also criticized Mr. Sanders for supporting higher taxes on wealthy Americans to help finance “Medicare for all.”

In an interview on CBS This Morning, Mr. Sanders did not shy away from calling himself a democratic socialist.

Mr. Trump, Mr. Sanders said, is “going to say, ‘Bernie Sanders wants the United States to become Venezuela.’”

“Bernie Sanders does not want to have the United States become the horrific economic situation that unfortunately exists in Venezuela right now,” he said. “What Bernie Sanders wants is to learn from countries around the world why other countries are doing a better job of dealing with income and wealth inequality than we are.”

Mr. Sanders will start with several advantages, including the foundation of a 50-state organization; a massive lead among low-dollar donors that is roughly equivalent to the donor base of all the other Democratic hopefuls combined; and a cache of fervent, unwavering supporters. A coveted speaker, he is still capable of electrifying crowds in a way few politicians can. He enjoys wide name recognition, and several early polls on the 2020 race had Mr. Sanders running second behind former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr.

[Check out the 2020 Democratic field with our candidate tracker.]

And while rising stars like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Ayanna Pressley have siphoned off some of his authority over the progressive wing of the party, he still claims to have spawned a “political revolution” that, true revolution or not, has ignited a generation of young, socialist-leaning voters and has reshaped the Democratic Party. While Mr. Sanders caucuses with the Democrats, he remains an independent and has not joined the party.

Mr. Sanders is also partly responsible for the party’s decision last year to overhaul its presidential nomination process, including sharply reducing the influence of superdelegates and increasing the transparency around debates — factors he felt greatly favored Hillary Clinton in 2016.
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Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont marched with others from a prayer service at Zion Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., to the state house last month during an event on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.


Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont marched with others from a prayer service at Zion Baptist Church in Columbia, S.C., to the state house last month during an event on Martin Luther King Jr. Day.CreditTravis Dove for The New York Times
Asked in his interview with CBS what would be different about this presidential run compared to 2016, Mr. Sanders replied bluntly: “We’re going to win.”

“Bottom line,” he said, “it is absolutely imperative that Donald Trump be defeated.” Though he had harsh words for the president, he said he was fond of the five other senators who were running for the Democratic nomination. “They are in some cases my friends,” he said in the interview, which was broadcast shortly after his Tuesday announcement.

With his booming voice and familiar wide-armed grip at the lectern, Mr. Sanders has long positioned himself as a champion of the working class and a passionate opponent of Wall Street and the moneyed elite. His remarks often include diatribes against “the millionaihs and billionaihs” — one of his most common refrains is that the “three wealthiest people in America own more wealth than the bottom 50 percent” — as well as denunciations of “super PACs” and the influence of big money on politics. In particular, he has sharply criticized Amazon and Walmart over their wages and treatment of workers.


In his email to supporters, as well as a campaign announcement video, Mr. Sanders laid out a litany of policy issues, familiar to anyone who has followed him through the years: universal health care, tuition-free public college, women’s reproductive rights, lower prescription drug prices, criminal justice reform.

“Our campaign is about taking on the powerful special interests that dominate our economic and political life,” he said.

While some presidential candidates have avoided direct broadsides against President Trump, Mr. Sanders — ever combative — addressed his potential opponent head on.

“You know as well as I do that we are living in a pivotal and dangerous moment in American history,” he said. “We are running against a president who is a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy as he leads us in an authoritarian direction.”

Born in Brooklyn, with an accent to match, Mr. Sanders ran unsuccessfully in the 1970s for governor and United States senator in Vermont before being elected mayor of Burlington in 1981. For 16 years, he served as the only congressman in the state before he was elected to the Senate in 2006.

Mr. Sanders has been a modest legislator and something of a lone wolf in Washington, promoting largely the same legislative agenda since his early days as a mayor. He voted against the Iraq War and, in 2008, he was one of roughly two dozen senators to vote against the $700 billion bailout of big banks.

And while he is often viewed as a pesky left-wing gadfly, he is also known to reach across the aisle, working on legislation with Senator Charles E. Grassley of Iowa and Senator John McCain of Arizona, both Republicans. He has rationalized voting for the 1994 crime bill, now heavily criticized for some of its draconian provisions, by saying he had favored progressive parts of the bill, including the Violence Against Women Act, while strongly opposing measures that would lead to mass incarceration.

Mr. Sanders is the longest-serving independent in congressional history, a point of pride for him but one of consternation and annoyance for some Democrats who are quick to suggest he does not have the party’s interests at heart. Some Democrats blame him for Mrs. Clinton’s loss in 2016, saying his anti-establishment rhetoric during his campaign inflamed divisions in the party that proved insurmountable.

Mr. Sanders largely avoided scrutiny during his 2016 presidential run but he will likely face more direct attacks from his opponents and more attention from the news media in a second bid for the White House.

One 2016 campaign issue that will almost certainly resurface is his record on gun control, Democratic strategists have said, given the intensity of the debate around gun violence following recent mass shootings. In 2005, Mr. Sanders voted for a law that granted immunity to gun manufacturers and dealers from most liability lawsuits. Mr. Sanders has also come under fire for support he received from the N.R.A. when he was running for Congress in 1990, in part because he vowed not to support a bill that mandated a waiting period for handgun sales.

Though his message is well worn, Mr. Sanders has indicated that he is trying to remedy weaknesses from his first presidential campaign. In recent months, he has made a series of trips to the South, where in 2016 he drew less than 20 percent of the black vote. On the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday this year, he made a two-day swing through South Carolina — where black voters made up about 60 percent of the Democratic primary vote in 2016 — that included addressing supporters and students and speaking with lawmakers.

In a radio interview with Mark Thompson, a progressive African-American radio host, Mr. Sanders said his message included a call to “end institutional racism” though he only offered some broad agenda items for addressing inequality.

“We’ve got to pay special attention to those people who have been hard hit economically, we have to invest in urban communities, and we have to deal with all of the massive disparities that currently exist in American society,” he said.

He has also tried to shore up his foreign policy credentials, becoming a vocal critic of the United States support of Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen. Late last year, the Senate passed a resolution, which Mr. Sanders helped introduce, to end American military assistance for the kingdom’s war there.
He raised a million dollars online within just a few hours of the announcement.

Bernie's decision will doubtless provoke controversy, and I will reiterate that I wish he and Warren were not both running, to avoid the risk of splitting the progressive vote. At least I don't think it will be as polarized a race as last times, since so many candidates are running. Hopefully Sanders will do what he did in 2016- fire up young progressives, push the Democrats to the Left, and keep issues that are often sidelined front and centre. However, in some ways I think that he will face a tougher race this time, despite his higher name recognition out the gate. He'll be running against other strong progressives, and the Democratic Party as a whole has moved further to the Left (albeit a lot of that is thanks to Bernie). So I feel like others may steal his thunder. He is also going to have to contend with the allegations of sexual harassment and unequal pay on his last campaign, and show that he can win over more of the black and latino vote this time around. And deal with the simple fact that he is a white man, in a time when the Democratic Party increasingly relies on the votes of women and minorities, and there is a large block of the party who feel we are past due for a female President, especially in the era of Me Too. And, ultimately, he will have to prove that he can unite the party behind him, rather than his nomination triggering a mass exodus of centrists to Howard Schultz or another like him.

That said, going off recent polling of the support for candidates and likely candidates in the Democratic Primary, Bernie Sanders is now the most popular candidate who has actually announced. For the first time, therefore, Bernie supporters can bask in the fact that Bernie Sanders is, for the time being at least, the Democratic front-runner (though I expect that to end when and if Joe Biden declares).

For the time being, my support still leans towards Warren. But at this point I believe that it will most likely end up being a three-way primary between Harris, Biden, and the Bern. In that scenario I probably would lean Sanders, but it will depend on how the candidates handle themselves over the remaining year or so before the primary. In Harris and Biden's case, they need to show me that they will embrace progressive positions and can get progressive voters enthusiastically behind them. In Bernie's case, he needs to show he can win over enough minorities and moderates.

Edit: Another factor for Bernie is that a lot of the more rabidly "anti-establishment" supporters of his will probably not back him this time around- they regard him as a traitor for not running an independent campaign against Hillary after he lost the nomination. :wanker: So he can't necessarily rely on his entire base returning to him, although I think those nuts are a fairly small percentage of his supporters (I hope).
"I know its easy to be defeatist here because nothing has seemingly reigned Trump in so far. But I will say this: every asshole succeeds until finally, they don't. Again, 18 months before he resigned, Nixon had a sky-high approval rating of 67%. Harvey Weinstein was winning Oscars until one day, he definitely wasn't."-John Oliver: https://youtube.com/watch?v=zxT8CM8XntA

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 03:18pm

Bernie Sanders will be holding a CNN town hall on Monday night.
"I know its easy to be defeatist here because nothing has seemingly reigned Trump in so far. But I will say this: every asshole succeeds until finally, they don't. Again, 18 months before he resigned, Nixon had a sky-high approval rating of 67%. Harvey Weinstein was winning Oscars until one day, he definitely wasn't."-John Oliver: https://youtube.com/watch?v=zxT8CM8XntA

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Gandalf » 2019-02-19 03:40pm

I wonder if we'll see a repeat of "being uncomfortable with a black governor doesn't necessarily make you racist" or any other odd remarks.
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That we dying younger hiding from the police man over there
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Electric shocking body rocking beat streeting me to death"

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 03:51pm

Gandalf wrote:
2019-02-19 03:40pm
I wonder if we'll see a repeat of "being uncomfortable with a black governor doesn't necessarily make you racist" or any other odd remarks.
I think that "Bernie is a racist" is mostly a smear campaign. But he is making a mistake, I think, in that he is trying to appeal to both conservative white working class voters. His priority should be addressing the concerns of the oppressed whatever their race, not trying to win over insecure white Trumpers.

I also think that Bernie has fallen a bit behind the times in some ways. To some extent, his determination to stick to his core issues and not shift with the wind has been a strength, giving him a reputation for integrity and allowing him to focus on issues that often get neglected. But the Democratic party is more and more catching up to him on progressive economics, and his narrow focus has caused him to fall behind the times on other issues, especially social justice issues. I don't think that Bernie hates black people. I don't think he believes that they should be denied the rights of white people. But I also don't think that he has put as much thought or passion into social justice issues as he has into economics*. And that will hurt him in this election, as it hurt him in 2016.


*Granted, the two issues are interrelated in many ways.

Edit: I also think, as noted above, that Bernie is no longer as revolutionary on economic policy as he was. The Democratic Party hasn't completely caught up to him, but they've come a long way (some candidates further than others).

If he really wanted to stand out, and do something really bold, he'd endorse universal basic income. He has, however, been frustratingly unwilling to commit to doing so.
"I know its easy to be defeatist here because nothing has seemingly reigned Trump in so far. But I will say this: every asshole succeeds until finally, they don't. Again, 18 months before he resigned, Nixon had a sky-high approval rating of 67%. Harvey Weinstein was winning Oscars until one day, he definitely wasn't."-John Oliver: https://youtube.com/watch?v=zxT8CM8XntA

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by GrosseAdmiralFox » 2019-02-19 04:43pm

Even if Bernie has gotten the nomination, he still has to contend with a Russia-backed Trump in 2020 unless the US IC manages to shut it down.

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Gandalf » 2019-02-19 04:46pm

GrosseAdmiralFox wrote:
2019-02-19 04:43pm
Even if Bernie has gotten the nomination, he still has to contend with a Russia-backed Trump in 2020 unless the US IC manages to shut it down.
:lol:

Or people could... turn up and vote.
"Oh no, oh yeah, tell me how can it be so fair
That we dying younger hiding from the police man over there
Just for breathing in the air they wanna leave me in the chair
Electric shocking body rocking beat streeting me to death"

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Re: Bernie Sanders to run in 2020

Post by FaxModem1 » 2019-02-19 05:28pm

It's official, he's in the running:

NPR
Bernie Sanders Launches 2020 Presidential Campaign, No Longer An Underdog
February 19, 20196:22 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition
Headshot of Scott Detrow, 2018
SCOTT DETROW

Twitter
Jessica Taylor at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
JESSICA TAYLOR

Twitter

Sen. Bernie Sanders, an independent who became an ideological leader in the Democratic Party after his 2016 campaign against Hillary Clinton, faces a far more crowded and liberal field this time.
Alex Brandon/AP
Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is giving it another go, launching a second campaign for the White House four years after surprising Democrats with a strong bid for the party's 2016 nomination.

"We began the political revolution in the 2016 campaign, and now it's time to move that revolution forward," the independent senator told Vermont Public Radio in an interview airing Tuesday morning.

'Does It Have To Be Him?': N.H. Progressives Split By Another Sanders Bid
POLITICS
'Does It Have To Be Him?': N.H. Progressives Split By Another Sanders Bid
But this 2020 bid will undoubtedly be a very different presidential campaign than his quest for the Democratic nomination as an underdog in 2016. Sanders enters the race as a top contender who, along with former Vice President Joe Biden, tops most early polls, far outpacing other Democratic candidates in support and name identification.

It's a sharp contrast from when Sanders seemingly came out of nowhere to surprise the political class — and at times himself — by winning several key primaries against former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Buoyed by a big early win in New Hampshire, Sanders fought Clinton for the Democratic nomination through the final June contests, drawing tens of thousands of supporters to rallies in the process.

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In the years since his loss to Clinton, Sanders has remained a national leader of the Democratic Party, though he still refuses to join.

"I think we have had real success in moving the ideology of the Democratic Party to be a pro-worker party, to stand up to the billionaire class," Sanders told NPR during the 2018 midterms. "We've got a long way to go."

Many of the issues he has promoted for years — most notably a Medicare-for-all national health care plan and a $15 an hour minimum wage — have shifted from the party's fringe to its mainstream, and are now seen as effective litmus tests for presidential candidates.

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Indeed, Sanders' most recent Medicare-for-all bill was cosponsored by fellow presidential candidates Sens. Kamala Harris, Kirsten Gillibrand, Cory Booker and Elizabeth Warren. The Senate's other presidential candidate, Amy Klobuchar, co-sponsored Sanders' most recent $15 minimum wage bill, in addition to the other four.

Sanders pointed to the Democratic Party's leftward shift as a reason for a second run. "It turns out that many of the ideas that I talked about — that health care is a right, not a privilege, and that we've got to move toward a Medicare-for-all, single-payer system: very, very popular. The idea that we have got to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour," he told Vermont Public Radio. "When I talked about making public colleges and universities tuition-free and lowering student debt, that was another issue that people said was too radical. Well, that's also happening around the country."

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But running in 2020, Sanders could be a victim of his own success.

While Sanders provided liberal Democratic primary voters with a sharp contrast to Clinton's political pragmatism in 2016, progressives will have no shortage of candidates to choose from in the increasingly broad and diverse 2020 field.

Most declared Democrats support Sanders' vision of nationalized health care, and more robust federal programs and policies, all funded by higher taxes on top income earners.

And in a party that has placed an increasing premium on being more representative of the broader electorate and country in recent years, many other candidates will offer voters the 77-year-old's platform — with the added benefit of youth and diversity.

"My question is, does he provide added value in this campaign for 2020? Or are there a lot of people who sort of carry very similar messages? Does it have to be him? I don't think it does, and I admire him," New Hampshire radio host Arnie Arnesen, a 2016 Sanders supporter, recently told NPR. "I think it's time for us to start creating a new bench. And the new bench isn't old, it shouldn't be white and it probably shouldn't be male."

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Asked by Vermont Public Radio how he will pitch his candidacy in such a diverse and progressive field, Sanders argued, "We have got to look at candidates not by the color of their skin, not by their sexual orientation or gender and not by their age. I think we have got to try to move us toward a nondiscriminatory society that looks at people based on their abilities, based on what they stand for."

There have been hurdles as Sanders prepared to run again in 2020. His campaign has had to answer to charges of sexism and harassment by staffers in 2016, with his former campaign manager acknowledging "a failure." Sanders also had to clarify comments about the role of racism in the 2018 campaign, addressing the losses of gubernatorial candidates Andrew Gillum in Florida and Stacey Abrams in Georgia.

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Sanders took several steps to maintain his national political profile and strengthen his presidential prospects in recent years, including his support for Democratic candidates in 2018.

Frequently criticized by the Clinton campaign during 2016 for ignoring foreign policy, he delivered several high-profile speeches laying out a progressive worldview that attempts to thread the needle between a broad, America-As-World-Police approach to international politics, and President Trump's isolationist views.

Sanders also played a lead role opposing Republican attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act and engaged with the Democratic National Committee that famously opposed his 2016 campaign, as revealed in internal emails stolen by Russian hackers and posted to Wikileaks.
So, barring Biden joining the running, he looks like the Democrats best bet.
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by FaxModem1 » 2019-02-19 05:37pm

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by GrosseAdmiralFox » 2019-02-19 05:47pm

Gandalf wrote:
2019-02-19 04:46pm

Or people could... turn up and vote.
Nope, there is evidence that Russian Intelligence had manipulated the 2016 elections to an existential extent. Or have you forgotten that 12 Russian intelligence officers had been indited by Mueller?

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Elfdart » 2019-02-19 06:12pm

Gandalf wrote:
2019-02-19 04:46pm
GrosseAdmiralFox wrote:
2019-02-19 04:43pm
Even if Bernie has gotten the nomination, he still has to contend with a Russia-backed Trump in 2020 unless the US IC manages to shut it down.
:lol:

Or people could... turn up and vote.
Nah, it's much easier to type "russia, Russia, RUSSIA!" and claim Putin is going to turn off your grandma's heat during the winter.
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Gandalf » 2019-02-19 06:16pm

Elfdart wrote:
2019-02-19 06:12pm
Gandalf wrote:
2019-02-19 04:46pm
GrosseAdmiralFox wrote:
2019-02-19 04:43pm
Even if Bernie has gotten the nomination, he still has to contend with a Russia-backed Trump in 2020 unless the US IC manages to shut it down.
:lol:

Or people could... turn up and vote.
Nah, it's much easier to type "russia, Russia, RUSSIA!" and claim Putin is going to turn off your grandma's heat during the winter.
Clearly the Reds Under the Bed forced the Democrats to run an horrific campaign. And then they forced the media to give Trump billions in free media coverage. Then they kept everyone home. Who do they think they are, the US in Latin America?
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by FaxModem1 » 2019-02-19 06:31pm

On-topic, Sanders is solid on his stances, and they overlap with a lot of the other primary candidates. What are the chances of candidates bowing out gracefully and not turning the Democratic primary leading into 2020 into a total mudslinging contest?
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by FireNexus » 2019-02-19 06:45pm

The Romulan Republic wrote:
2019-02-19 03:12pm
Another factor for Bernie is that a lot of the more rabidly "anti-establishment" supporters of his will probably not back him this time around- they regard him as a traitor for not running an independent campaign against Hillary after he lost the nomination. :wanker: So he can't necessarily rely on his entire base returning to him, although I think those nuts are a fairly small percentage of his supporters (I hope).
I think the bigger part of his base that will peel off is the “Not Hillary” part. Which, no telling how big that was, but I suspect pretty big. He never had people of color in any meaningful way. Whether the millennial progressives stick with the bern or peel off to Warren is anyone’s guess.

I do think that we should get ready for an oppo barrage against Sanders now that he’s announced. It’s not going to be hands off this cycle. If it were me, I’d get something in the news cycle Sunday so he’ll be confronted with questions at his Monday town hall.
I had a Bill Maher quote here. But fuck him for his white privelegy "joke".

All the rest? Too long.

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by LadyTevar » 2019-02-19 07:05pm

BERNIE SANDERS TOPICS MERGED
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 08:37pm

FireNexus wrote:
2019-02-19 06:45pm
The Romulan Republic wrote:
2019-02-19 03:12pm
Another factor for Bernie is that a lot of the more rabidly "anti-establishment" supporters of his will probably not back him this time around- they regard him as a traitor for not running an independent campaign against Hillary after he lost the nomination. :wanker: So he can't necessarily rely on his entire base returning to him, although I think those nuts are a fairly small percentage of his supporters (I hope).
I think the bigger part of his base that will peel off is the “Not Hillary” part. Which, no telling how big that was, but I suspect pretty big. He never had people of color in any meaningful way. Whether the millennial progressives stick with the bern or peel off to Warren is anyone’s guess.

I do think that we should get ready for an oppo barrage against Sanders now that he’s announced. It’s not going to be hands off this cycle. If it were me, I’d get something in the news cycle Sunday so he’ll be confronted with questions at his Monday town hall.
If by "people of color" you mean black voters... that's more or less accurate. And that is the main shortcoming of his 2016 campaign that he will have to remedy if he wants to be viable in a Democratic primary. There are smaller racial minority groups where he registered strong support.

He'll undoubtably lose some votes to Warren (Warren was actually the progressive favorite to challenge Hillary in 2016 until it became clear she wouldn't run, and Bernie entered the fray instead). However, at this point Bernie is substantially out-polling Warren (more's the pity). We'll see how long that lasts.

I actually think that Bernie will be hammered less than he was in 2016, since its not just him vs. the "establishment". Unless he maintains front-runner position, then everyone will want a piece of him (same as any other frontrunner).

He absolutely should be grilled as heavily as any other frontrunner, although as I've said before, I think that Dems going all out in trying to trash Bernie straight out the gate would be a mistake, especially if it involves a) saying he shouldn't run, or b) saying that Bernie/all his supporters are racists/misogynists. It would dredge up a lot of bad memories and old resentments, and deepen divisions in what should be a united opposition to Trump. And that is playing the Kremlin's game.

What is most important to me is that whoever the nominee is, they don't get so badly mauled in the primary as to be unelectable in the general. I think we should try and run as civil a primary as possible. Debate policy by all means, but unless there is clear evidence that a candidate is a complete deviant or fascist or something, or that they've committed a felony, avoid going into personal mudslinging.
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Ziggy Stardust » 2019-02-19 09:41pm

It's obviously way too early in the process for any polling to be reliable, but I think some of the anti-Sanders folks here are overstating the case against him a little bit. Current polls that I'm seeing suggest Sanders having a pretty big advantage over many of the other potential candidates. Yes, a lot can happen between now and the primaries as the actual campaigns unfold, and early polling is notoriously unreliable, so I'm not trying to say he should be considered a prohibitive favorite or anything. I think people are just underestimating how much momentum sheer name recognition gives you in politics, when most voters don't care about issues to the level of detail that people here do. Especially in an oversaturated media market, people tend to go with what's familiar. And Sanders is more familiar than most of the alternatives at this point.

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 09:56pm

I think he'll be one of the stronger candidates, but its possible other progressives, and baggage from 2016, will bleed enough support to keep him in second (or drop him to third or fourth) place. Biden is still the favourite, should he decide to run.

Edit: That said, if Biden declined to run, polling suggests that at this moment Bernie Sanders would be the man to beat for the Democratic nomination. Which is frankly a stunning place to be in.
"I know its easy to be defeatist here because nothing has seemingly reigned Trump in so far. But I will say this: every asshole succeeds until finally, they don't. Again, 18 months before he resigned, Nixon had a sky-high approval rating of 67%. Harvey Weinstein was winning Oscars until one day, he definitely wasn't."-John Oliver: https://youtube.com/watch?v=zxT8CM8XntA

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by Mr Bean » 2019-02-19 10:40pm

The Romulan Republic wrote:
2019-02-19 09:56pm
I think he'll be one of the stronger candidates, but its possible other progressives, and baggage from 2016, will bleed enough support to keep him in second (or drop him to third or fourth) place. Biden is still the favourite, should he decide to run.

Edit: That said, if Biden declined to run, polling suggests that at this moment Bernie Sanders would be the man to beat for the Democratic nomination. Which is frankly a stunning place to be in.
Keep in mind the place where Senator Sanders is, the presumed front runner because he was the runner up last time and the only one to seriously challenge Secretary Clinton plus he got lots of extra air-time post election for the simple fact that Secretary Clinton LOST. He has a nice little what-if story attached to him because we know what Clinton V Trump 2016 turned out as, there is an excellent case to be made that Sanders V Trump 2016 would have gone quite differently, not a for sure thing, not a 100% Senator Sanders would have won where Secretary Clinton lost but the simple what if out there with a democratic base that loathes the current President with an unusually high fervor gives him a standing base the other 10+ challengers won't have.

Or to put it another way, Senator Bernie Sanders enters the race likely with 25% of the Democratic vote in his pocket from 2016, and the other 75% of the vote will be fought over by 10+ other people. It will can probably safely be said until Iowa that he will be the front runner with that 25% if he does not pick up a single extra vote by simple vote dilution.

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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by The Romulan Republic » 2019-02-19 10:53pm

All true enough. Though at this point, I actually don't think Bernie would have been likely to win 2016 either. He might have carried the Mid-Western states of Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin that sealed Clinton's defeat and picked up the one EC vote in Maine that Trump got (maybe). But I'd be every cent in my bank account that he would have lost Virginia, which she narrowly won (since he had difficulties with the black vote in the primary and presumably would not have had Kaine as his running mate). Presuming all other states stayed the same (which seems fairly plausible to me), Sanders would have gone down 266/272 in the Electoral College. Which is closer than Clinton's loss, to be sure, but still a loss. The only way he could have won would be if he flipped a state that wasn't as close, such as Iowa or Ohio, to make up for the loss of Virginia.

But yeah, he's kind of the front-runner by default right now. It'll be interesting to see where we stand after Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina, etc. thin the herd.
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Re: Bernie Sanders announces 2020 Presidential campaign.

Post by FireNexus » 2019-02-19 11:45pm

I actually think that Bernie will be hammered less than he was in 2016, since its not just him vs. the "establishment". Unless he maintains front-runner position, then everyone will want a piece of him (same as any other frontrunner).
This is kind of the point. Nobody with an interest in beating him was grilling him in 2016. Clinton undrestimated him until he started winning primaries then had her hands tied behind her back trying to keep from losing his base.

That’s not going to be a problem this time. And him being the front runner means that everyone wants a piece of him from day one. Nobody is going to underestimate him, or pull punches in fear they’ll underestimate him, this time.
I had a Bill Maher quote here. But fuck him for his white privelegy "joke".

All the rest? Too long.

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